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-   -   Legend of Grimrock - review @ RPGCodex (http://www.rpgwatch.com/forums/showthread.php?t=18155)

Myrthos September 28th, 2012 05:34

Legend of Grimrock - review @ RPGCodex
 
RPGCodex played Legend of Grimrock and had amongst other this to say:
Quote:

The only real complaint I did have was the level design. At first, I really did thnk the levels were randomly generated. Randomly twisting corridors, dead-end rooms that made no sense and arbitrarily placed puzzles all made me think it was being generated on the fly. Unfortunately, it wasn't. This has two effects, the first being that replayability is limited - Legend of Grimrock is the same every time you play it. The second effect is that, in my opinion, they're designed like someone pulled something out of their ass, smeared it on canvas and said "that'll do pig, that'll do". Still, provided you never ask "just why the hell did someone build a room with this kind of trap / puzzle in it anyway?", you'll do fine.

As I've said before, the puzzles themselves are very well designed - with plenty of adequately obscure (but not too obscure) clues found nearby (if you look hard enough). It was only on Level 9 when everything went to shit for me where after successfully getting through the game without help up until that point, I had to google for assistance. Working out what to sacrifice, missing a switch in the wall and just how exactly one should slither… In hind-sight, the switch should've been obvious but after the slithering puzzle (a note I had written off as a clue on how to fight the Big Bad that the game continually hinted was coming up), I honestly thought I'd missed something somewhere. And I would have been completely stumped at the sacrificial altars without reading the help in the forums.
More information.

Tuco September 28th, 2012 05:34

Quote:

The only real complaint I did have was the level design.
Which is probably the best thing in the game.

JDR13 September 28th, 2012 06:44

The only puzzle I had to Google an answer for was the "slithering" path. I didn't have issues with any of the other things he mentions, and I thought the level design was quite good.

Still the best indie title I've ever played.

ChienAboyeur September 28th, 2012 08:58

Informative review.

A stream of players nowadays wish for a return to bases.

The review shows multiple troubles this desire brings forth.

LoG has for example one old school feature, mapping oneself tile by tile the dungeons.
Parallelly, it has auto mapping.
Old school boys often dislike when clues are laid around in an obvious manner, the case in many present games.

The review shows that the automapping is a game changer. When surveying tile by tile a map, it is easier not to miss rather concealed clues, or less obviously displayed hints. As one has to go one tile after another. The game also provides a note tool to mark one tile.

But with the auto mapping feature on, surveying the map is no longer a priority. And it changes the whole game as it calls for more obviously displayed clues.

The game also relies a lot on puzzles. And here again, another game changer has been introduced: the capacity to find very quickly a bit of information. It dissolves puzzles.

Many players declare a love for immersion, which is hard to comprehend.

In this type of games, adventurers are bound to wander aimlessly as they try to understand how to progress, as they scavenge etc
Yet this experience is very hard to convey as players, even those who demand immersion, usually consider that game period of time empty time. While when lost in some dungeons, roaming around is part of the experience of adventurers, players no longer bear to allocate time to live this kind of experience (making by the way immersion a very flimsy concept)

The capacity to get a bit of information very quickly destroys the opportunity.
In the past, with no internet, players would have been forced to take a break from the game for example, come back later and roam aimlessly, looking for a clue they do not know. They would have experienced what it is to be lost in some dungeons.
But now, it is over, a go on the web and the information is found.

Players' consumer habits have changed: players no longer want to "waste" time on activity that is essential to the definition of a game. They want to consume their game fast, they discriminate against a certain type of actions to favour certain type of actions.

This review and the experience it tells of gives perspective. It shows that game designers have listened to what players want. And that the current iteration in gaming is what players want. The trouble is that players do not usually tell what they want. Or claim to want to play something and when they have it, refuse to play it.

Game designers have followed the trend.

baron September 28th, 2012 12:12

Quote:

Originally Posted by Myrthos (Post 1061163278)
RPGCodex played Legend of Grimrock and had amongst other this to say:

The only real complaint I did have was the level design. At first, I really did thnk the levels were randomly generated. Randomly twisting corridors, dead-end rooms that made no sense and arbitrarily placed puzzles all made me think it was being generated on the fly. Unfortunately, it wasn't. This has two effects, the first being that replayability is limited - Legend of Grimrock is the same every time you play it. The second effect is that, in my opinion, they're designed like someone pulled something out of their ass, smeared it on canvas and said "that'll do pig, that'll do". Still, provided you never ask "just why the hell did someone build a room with this kind of trap / puzzle in it anyway?", you'll do fine.

As I've said before, the puzzles themselves are very well designed - with plenty of adequately obscure (but not too obscure) clues found nearby (if you look hard enough). It was only on Level 9 when everything went to shit for me where after successfully getting through the game without help up until that point, I had to google for assistance. Working out what to sacrifice, missing a switch in the wall and just how exactly one should slither… In hind-sight, the switch should've been obvious but after the slithering puzzle (a note I had written off as a clue on how to fight the Big Bad that the game continually hinted was coming up), I honestly thought I'd missed something somewhere. And I would have been completely stumped at the sacrificial altars without reading the help in the forums.

More information.

it's a good review.
why are you quoting those paragraphs, out of the many?

Thaurin September 28th, 2012 12:15

Quote:

Originally Posted by baron (Post 1061163306)
it's a good review.
why are you quoting those paragraphs, out of the many?

I've noticed that Myrthos tends to focus on the negative in reviews, probably to point out the potentially bad in a game so that you can decide if that's a deal-breaker or not. I tend to agree with this method.

DArtagnan September 28th, 2012 12:23

If you spend a few seconds thinking about this and read the text, you will find the following as the first sentence:

The only real complaint I did have was the level design

To me, this means the quote is quite inclusive and relevant.

darkling September 28th, 2012 12:47

It's a weird review for RPGCodex, IMO. The review has never played a Dungeon Master-styled game before, it seems. How are they reviewing things on RPGCodex?! Aren't they SUPPOSED to be all oldschool, in terms of RPGs? :P

rune_74 September 28th, 2012 17:09

Quote:

Originally Posted by darkling (Post 1061163315)
It's a weird review for RPGCodex, IMO. The review has never played a Dungeon Master-styled game before, it seems. How are they reviewing things on RPGCodex?! Aren't they SUPPOSED to be all oldschool, in terms of RPGs? :P

old school does not equal ingnorant….

regomar September 29th, 2012 03:12

That review is dildos.

The level design is the best part of this game. Pretty much every great game it's paying homage to had maze-like corridors that ended in dead ends and puzzles strewn throughout. Thats how these games are designed, it's SUPPOSED to be a maze. Idiot reviewer…

DeepO September 29th, 2012 03:19

A fun review.

More or less, it´s a review concerning the whole subgenre, but the reviewer happened to "get it" in the end.
Cool.

darkling September 29th, 2012 13:48

Yeah, it's a good review! I just would expect that kind of "fresh" take on the genre from a more mainstream site than from the uber-hardcore Wizardry-loving RPG Codex.

HiddenX September 29th, 2012 13:57

Hey - Some of us at the 'Watch are über-hardcore Wizardry-loving fanatics as well… ;)


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