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January 4th, 2009, 18:32
The online activation thing feels to me a lot like a case of a publisher trying to have its cake and eat it too. (Not that I ever really understood that phrase - I guess after you eat it you no longer have it or something.)
Yep that's what it means. Why is this phrase a source of so much confusion?

My main point in all of this is - I'm playing old games by dead companies on new computers … will I be able to do that with *your* game when your company is dead? If not, you are not living up to your side of the EULA and need to take action to protect *me*.
Even if the current EULAs say something about the company giving you a perpetual right to play the game (god knows I don't read those things), it would be a trivial matter to amend the agreements to take online activation into account. Presto. But that's nitpicking.

Look, I'm Mr. Lovegoingbackandplayingoldgames, especially old RPGs that spare me the 30 hours of crappy voiceacting. But do we have some fundamental right to eternal games? If your old VHS tape copy of <Whatever> finally wears out, the company won't replace it for free. If you buy a book and the binding starts losing pages after ten years of reading and re-reading, I don't think you should have a cause of action. I see that there's a conceptual difference between losing access to your game based entirely on the game company's fortunes and my examples in which your own actions play a part, but isn't the end result the same?

I buy games, so of course I prefer a solution that lets me keep them forever and ever, and thankfully our old friends the pirates will probably be able to circumvent anything the companies throw at us. But is there really a fairness problem with buying a game that you can only play for 5 years? For 3?

I dunno.
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