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January 18th, 2009, 15:49
Originally Posted by DArtagnan View Post
I know there's this idea that technology is constantly evolving, and the evolution of gameplay is stagnating - but in my opinion it has very little to do with technology itself. Also, Torment was basically an interactive book with RPG elements, and definitely not the flag-carrier for advanced gameplay. No, the story and presentation would hold it back today, not the simplistic gameplay.

But as I said, technology is not the problem. It's the audience - and before we can see a modern equivalent of PS:T, we need the general audience ready for such an experience. When I say equivalent - I mean in terms of production values. Torment had reasonably good production values, which means the investment was not insignificant. That's really the key to a repeat, that a reasonable investment will yield a reasonable return.
Mmh, interesting points, I have to admit. But I think the audience also has shifted in their expectations. There are not more or less people that demand for sophisticated games in terms of story. There are only different expectations towards it's presentation.

People today also like artificial literature, but they wouldn't buy a blank copy Shakespeare or Goethe anymore. The use of a language and orchestration changes over the time. Also does the presentation of a game story. 3D isn't only a technical innovation, it's a dramaturgical element. Using cinematics in ingame engine, or - another example - transfering the whole print text into full voice overs wouldn't make PsT more or less intellectual, but could add a whole bunch of new, younger fans to that kind of gaming.
I think most of us grew up with 2D gaming. We all decided what kind of games we want to play, when 3D was right at the beginning. But meanwhile there is a new generation of gamers, that don't have that experience and surely don't want to go back to "the old days" they don't really know and they wouldn't feel comfortable with. PsT today couldn't be done in the way it has been done anno 1999. But there are new ways of game design, that could produce another game in that spirit. And that people would be willing to pay for. Making the product comfortable for the new kind of audience, without removing it's core strenghts.

Anyway, the only shot we have of another Torment, though I'm not personally a fan, is to have a talented indie developer make a go for it.
Many indie developers tend to stick to "the good old times". That's not the way it works, imho. I don't see any impulses coming from that corner of game development.

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