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November 3rd, 2011, 19:33
Is there really no room for different types of RPGs? Do we really need everything to be one-size-fits-all?

Look, I really enjoyed Fallout:New Vegas and The Witcher 2. I haven't played Alpha Protocol, but there are lots of folks here who thought it was pretty good. There are likely other examples of heavy C&C games I'm forgetting.

But I also enjoyed Divinity 2. And I enjoyed Dragon Age: Origins. And both Drakensang games. And Oblivion (sorta). And Baldur's Gate. And NWN2. And many other games that you pretty much see all the content in one play-through and then you're done.

I'll probably be in the minority here, but I prefer the latter style over the former. Mainly because I'm pushing 40 and have a life and just don't have time to replay games. I never have gone all the way through a game a 2nd time (with the notable exception of Diablo 2, but that was a long time ago). I never did finish F:NV, and despite my sincere desire to replay Witcher 2 to experience a completely different Act 2, I just haven't gotten around to it.

If there were no games being made with heavy C&C, then I can see why folks would be up in arms. But the market is providing both styles, and I think that's great.

I'll also add that just because your choices don't cut off content in Reckoning, that doesn't mean they don't have an impact on the game world, the story, and the characters. In fact, this week's Dev Q&A touches on this in a response to a general question about quest completion:

Q: Will quests have multiple ways to be finished? Such as instead of killing someone, you can persuade them to go away, etc. – By Fluent

A: Yes, there will be some quests in which the outcome can be altered by making different decisions. Some quests that have Persuasion options in them, may also give you extra EXP or varying rewards based on successful or failed Persuasion attempts. Quests which allow you the option to make different narrative choices may result in an NPC’s demeanor changing, one NPC living versus another, allowing the player to either keep a particular item or return it to its owner, and many other scenarios. There are also quests where you may decide that rather than attempt to persuade an NPC, you can help them out by running a side errand for them to progress the quest, or bribe them with gold to save yourself the time of running the errand. NPCs that you agree to help may offer you services after completing a quest for them, where they previously didn't offer you any before.

As you might imagine, another alternate way to prematurely end a quest would be to kill the quest giver or an NPC crucial to that quest. Some side-quests are linked together, or supplement the outcomes of other quests, so killing off quest NPCs may hinder the end result of a quest chain. You may have to complete favors for a few NPCs before they will unlock more quests, in which case killing the original quest givers might never allow you to unlock the follow up quests (sometimes, this may cause you to miss out on valuable rewards as well!). If you complete the tasks asked of you, the NPCs may reward you with certain weapons or items that will aid you in defeating a more powerful enemy at the end of the quest chain.

Quests in Amalur offer a wide variety of exploration, choice, and reward. I have found that this adds greatly to replay value, especially if you’re like me and enjoy creating multiple saves so you can see how things would have turned out if you made all the opposite decisions on another play-through. – By Kitty “Neko” Hughes, Level Designer
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Join Date: Mar 2009
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