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June 30th, 2012, 19:42
Originally Posted by DArtagnan View Post
The reason it's a problem to care too much about whether it's an RPG, is the psychological implication.

If you care, it's because you're emotionally connected to the genre. In this case, people are treasuring the RPG genre - because they've had great experiences with it. But your emotional connection is corrupting your ability to look at it rationally.

You may not really want to admit it, but the source is that you feel including a game you don't personally think is an RPG into the genre - somehow taints the genre. But the genre isn't your experiences - and it isn't your genre.
Taint is a bit strong… I'd argue most forumites who care enough to comment are worried it will further dilute an already diluted genre. Even if certain individuals have a stronger affinity for traditional CRPGs over other genres, they can still look at (and consider or argue) a game's classification in a rational way.
It's a category in which a lot of games belong that a lot of people wouldn't want there - but they're there.
Says who? Who has the authority to determine what qualifies as a "RPG" if there is no one true definition of what constitutes a "RPG"? To me, without a clear concise definition of RPG, any discussion is an exercise in futility. You may reject someone else's reality and impose your own, but it is not any more valid when objectivity is lacking(in this case a universally accepted definition)…

One reason humans classify things is to facilitate efficient communication of thoughts and ideas. Any classification that lacks specificity is irrelevant/useless. Like referring to every mammal as simply a mammal, their are numerous distinctions that warrant further specific classifications.

If you can't argue your case logically - then just give it up. Logic is the only universal language that approaches the objective. The rest is opinion. You don't think this or that qualifies as roleplaying - and across the street someone disagrees. Some people think making development choices are sufficient - some don't. There's no universal answer.

What matters is HOW the game is - not WHAT it is.
So why bother making an argument if everyone is both right and wrong depending on from whose perspective you view the debate? Can you honestly separate "how the game is" from "what it is" while remaining true to your pursuit of objectivity?
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