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July 13th, 2012, 13:45
Apparently there is a cemetery with over 350 graves close to Lewis and Clark County Hospital. The hospital buliding was destroyed by an earthquake in 1935 and rebuilt. It was eventually converted (1961) to a covalescent home, but left the premises in 1984. And nobody knows exactly where the graves are. I'm waiting for the horror film based on this true story.

Establishing a graveyard close to a hospital is practical, even if patients may find the arrangement unsettling. Here in Bergen@Norway our largest cemetery (Møllendal) is the neighbour of our largest hospital (Haukeland), the view from the patient wards is excellent. However, as one of my teachers at med school taught us: "The purpose of patients being admitted to Haukeland is not to get them to Møllendal as quickly as possible". So, as usual, their (possible) worries were completely unfounded.

This particular teacher was quite funny. He was a very big man and his skin was somewhat reddish in colour. His subject was blood transfusions, so in general we referred to him as the world's largest erythrocyte (red blood cell).

pibbur who subscribes to the view that medicine would be more interesting and fun if there were (significantly) fewer patients. Less is more!

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Number 13

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Join Date: May 2012
Location: Bergen, Norway
Posts: 974