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July 26th, 2012, 09:51
With his passing I would recommend anyone who hasn't check out the Ray Bradbury books.

Martian Chronicles and The Illustrated Man are probably the weakest since they are collections of short stories. Some of these have been made into radio shows and on cable. However, they give you great insight into his ideas on colonization, isolation and censorship. They also serve to flesh out his most celebrated novels Fahrenheit 451 and Something Wicked This Way Comes.

The latter deals with age and happiness and is very American in its positive approach. A similar story of youth and nostalgia is found in Dandelion Wine, but its not sci-fi at all.

Have we mentioned the two books by Alfred Bester, The Demolished Man and The Stars, My Destination? Even though the cynicism is ahead of its time in its candidness its an amazing read. The movie Jumpers is a rip off of its premise

There's been a series of shows on the Science channel called The Prophets of Science Fiction. Its a fascinating series of biographies that have helped me appreciate the authors even more.

Other than Dick's fascination of what is real, thanks to problems with schizophrenia and LSD, we see what inspired stories like We Can Remember it for You Wholesale (Total Recall) which seems to be in the same universe as Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (Blade Runner).

I see now that HG Wells was a bit of a futurist with a very pessimistic outlook. It was fascinating to see how he was involved in the inspiration of the nuclear bomb and how horrified he became at its reality.

Should I bother with the John Carter books? They are free after all. Seems a lot of people have converted a lot of popular classical books to Kindle.

Developer of The Wizard's Grave Android game. Discussion Thread:
http://www.rpgwatch.com/forums/showthread.php?t=22520
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