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September 19th, 2012, 23:42
Physics

Originally Posted by Isaac Newton
For every action there is an opposite, and equal reaction.
The basis is that every solid material is given a certain amount of hit points based on the material. Flesh and bone might have, say, 10 hit points. So in my system, armor, instead of having the navy type "armor class" that Dave Arneson borrowed for D&D, It basically adds hit points to the player. Each armor type can absorb a certain amount of damage before you get past its resistance.

This is what they are good for then: extra hit points and damage resistance.

First round: attack. (both players hit automatically; no "to hits")

Goblin has one strength which modifies his 5 damage sword to 6. Goblin rolls its Luck and succeeds. Goblin will do 2x6=12 damage.

Tim has 10 hit points and is wearing steel armor (but not a shield). This is his first line of defense. Armor has 100 hit points has 10 points of damage resistance.

Therefore, the armor takes the first 10 points of the Goblin's sword damage and the next 2 points of damage are past Tim's only of defense. Tim is now down to 10-2=8 base hit points.

The armor now has 100-10=90 hit points from the damage it took. The sword also had 100 hit points. Tim's flesh has no damage resistance to steel so, all things being equal (see Newton above), the sword is also now at 100-10=90 hit points.

Now if Tim did have a shield there is a 50% chance the shield would have taken the first 10 points of damage and the armor the next 2.

Simultaneously, Tim cast "Kill Annoying Goblin". The Goblin fails his Luck and explodes in a bloody mess and Tim now has the option to take the Goblin's sword and whatever other treasure fell out of its stomach.

is that clearer?

Developer of The Wizard's Grave Android game. Discussion Thread:
http://www.rpgwatch.com/forums/showthread.php?t=22520
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