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October 1st, 2012, 21:20
In any large, multi-person project where you're maintaining a large code base of many different files, you often need a revision control system. If you want to make a change, then you need to check out the appropriate files, make your changes, and then check them back into the central repository. Often, two people will try to change the same files, which means that a merge process will take place to merge both branches into the 'head'.

There are many software packages that do this automatically through simple commandlines like 'ci' and 'co' (for check-in and check-out), so what you end up with is every file getting automatically updated with a new version number everytime somebody makes a change.

What this video is showing is a graphical representation of all the updates that were happening to every file in the project over a 3-year period. I believe that each 'node' is a directory, so you're basically seeing a visual representation of the directory tree, and how it changed over time.

Somebody here on my team did the same thing for our big project here at work, so I've seen this kind of visualization once before, but I'm still at a loss as to what purpose it serves. I guess it's just something a code junkie does because he can…
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