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December 8th, 2012, 10:18
Originally Posted by Zloth View Post
Not buying this article. He seems to be making a LOT of assumptions…. A game has one and only one objective. Doing something dull now to have more fun later is always bad. People can't possibly have fun doing the same thing more than once (so, if you run a dungeon more than once, you MUST be completely bored).
Building power is the fun players questing for power look for. The prospect of being powerful is fun. The security between effort and reward is also a guarantee that the fun to come exist.
Levelling up in MMOs gets slower at higher levels because they want you to become addicted (never mind that Dungeons & Dragons did the same thing).
Probably not.

A levelling up system is non essential to a a RPG.

It was introduced in the first RPGs to solve certain immediate issues.

Most RPGs of those days happened in a fictional world. Which were introduced for the first time.

The player, who lives in the real world, plays through an avatar who lives in the fictional world.

Immediate issue: how to close on the gap that exists between a player and her avatar?
By living in the fictional world, the avatar is expected to know of his own world while the player probably knows nothing of it.
How to get them to converge as the projection of the player into his avatar is required to get a good game experience?

One solution: get the avatar to be a full rookie in all terms possible. The farm boy who never left his farm and barely know who is the lord of his county.

As the avatar evolves in the world exterior to his farm, he is discovering it. Which is fine because the player's discovery parallels it and the player does the same through his avatar. Commonality of experience which makes it easier for the player to appropriate the avatar.
The gap is closed and the divergent situations erased.

Series like TES or TW have a similar introduction, prisoner or loss of memory. Everything to get the avatar on par with the player in terms of knowledge of the game world.

As to levelling up slower toward the end, simply mirroring what happens elsewhere. The first stages are fast progress while the latter stages are very slow or even decline (not well accepted by players seeking power and now nearly non existent in video gaming)
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