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June 14th, 2013, 17:07
This is looking pretty interesting… An open world gold box style game is appealing to me in theory, but it all depends on how interesting the quests are. I'm not interested in a million generic fetch quests or "go here and slay this monster" quests. I like quests that have a story behind them and affect the world at large. If I save a town from a dragon, the people should react to it. On the other hand, if I fail or turn down a quest, there should be consequences beyond not getting the gold or experience. I'd rather see a game with a smaller number of quests that are complex, well thought out, and unique than an endless grindfest. That was my issue with Skyrim- sure the world is huge, but for the most part it's SO boring.

Regarding the"Magic Identification" (aka Lore in D&D), I'm wondering how you plan to implement it. While the idea that a person who studies magical lore will be better able to identify legendary magic items certainly make sense, it doesn't really make sense the way this skill is often implemented; for example, in NWN 1 & 2, if you fail the lore check for a magic item, you simply cannot use / equip it until you either pay a merchant to identify it, or increase your lore skill. Usually this is a minor inconvenience; merchants charge ~100GP to identify an item or you can buy a lore potion / scroll to identify the items, so ultimately the lore skill isn't worth spending points on.

Moreover, f I found an unidentified weapon or armor with magic properties, why can't I use it in combat to see what it can do? Sure there's a risk it may be cursed but in a RPG I should have the option to take that risk. (Baldur's Gate lets you do this, which I think is one detail which made the game so fun). Which approach do plan to take regarding "magic identification"?

I'm also not sure how I feel about the logic behind Resistance skills being skills. It seems that a resistance to poison or disease would be determined by one's constitution (and magical spells or properties that raise it) but how could one raise it with experience? I suppose it could be the "acquired poison immunity" trope a la Princess Bride, but in reality this doesn't work for all poisons. (I know I'm talking about "reality" in a fantasy game, but when something isn't explained by magic, there should still be a logic or rationality to it). Arguably it works for resist disease (you could knowledge about strengthening your immune system). I'd prefer having some sort of alchemy skill that makes you able to brew healing potions or recognizing medicinal plants but I'm not entirely convinced that Resistance should be a skill you can upgrade with practice or research. Just my opinion though and I may be over-thinking this.
Last edited by daveyd; June 14th, 2013 at 17:39.
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