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July 9th, 2013, 14:02
Originally Posted by buckaroobonzai View Post
Example of gameplay philosophy:

A. The player has to get into a castle/stronghold occupied by bandits and goblins or unded.
They can attempt to get in in these ways:
1. Stealth
a. Sneak over the wall at night
b. hide in a crate or barrel on a goods supply wagon entering the castle
2. Exploration/Searching:
a. Search for a secret cave/tunnel entrance that goes under the castle to a secret room
3. Conversation, Diplomacy, Bluff/Intimidate:
a. Convince a bandit or hobgoblin to let you in (might be tons of conversation options have to weigh them carefully so not to be to much work)
b. Bribe a guard to open a gate at night
4. Disguise
a. Disguise as a bandit or hobgoblin and go in with a returning band of raiders
5. Magic:
a. scroll or potion of invisibility
b. scroll or potion of flying
c. scroll or potion of gaseous form (might be cheapest way to get in)
c. scroll or potion of alter self or polymorph (can bring up tons of roleplaying options: bird, dog, cat etc.

SO thoughts and ideas?
You wrote down roughly 10 different options of how to get into the one single castle in your game. The thing is, you have to code all these 10 different options either into the overall gameplay mechanics, or into scripted events for this specific castle.

If they are specifically scripted for this castle, the player will use only *one* of them. So 90% of your work will go unnoticed. Unless the player will play your game more than once, and even then he might choose the exact same option he chose the last time.

That's a lot of wasted work for a low budget RPG. The player is experiencing only 10% of the work you've done.

An open world game like Skyrim actually does offer a similar amount of options - often more - when facing a similar challenge, like entering the castle. But the options are coded into the overall gameplay mechanic. You can use them every time, when you must enter a place which is otherwise forbidden from you.

But if you do this in your game as well, then you are going to use enormous amount of time and money into the game core mechanics. And once you have done that, you might just as well build 5 castles instead of just one. Because once the tools are in place, the castle-building is the easy part.

To me it sounds like you want to do a heavily scripted game. It's really more like a point-and-click adventure game with stats, than what we think of as RPG's nowadays.

If so, the real problem is the "experience-ratio". It's not going to serve you well if the gamer can only experience 10% of the options you have laid out. People are going to play the game, and wonder why it's so short and simple, when compared to your budget and development time.

This is the reason why CRPG's tend to create interactive world environments, instead of heavily scripting each event. You get more bang for your buck.
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