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April 1st, 2007, 01:55
Sure, that's all true, but it keeps begging the question; why doesn't this apply to CDs or DVDs? Obviously, it does. And it *could* apply to games too. That's not a matter of economics, since the economic basis for these three industries are roughly the same, it's simply a matter of good economics.

And that's not just the exceptional movies or music that keeps selling high numbers (y'know, Godfather DVDs), there's a whole segment of the industry dedicated to it.

Any sane businessman would not answer Moriendor's question with "I'll just buy only 8% interest rate bonds" (unless he knows he can sail blindly 'pon them), any smart businessman would diversify over several bonds, both the long-term ones and the short-term ones. Hell, trying to go for the quick buck through Bubble-hypes may be the more visible side of the stock market, but it's not the only side of it, there's a good reason oil & food are quite popular on the markets, always and anywhere.

So, sure, you're technically right, *if* the argument was that producing mid-budget games aimed at the long-term to the exclusion of producing any other games is a viable business model. Of course it isn't.

But doesn't it strike you as odd that no matter how well your logic may work, the gaming industry is the exception in this undiversified portfolio, not the rule?
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