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May 18th, 2007, 22:26
All four of these guys clearly know what they're doing, and being writers, were able to express their ideas very well. What a fabulous interview!

The first question following the introduction outlined everything — the ambition of dialogue in CRPG as the writer sees it, the challenges involved, the tools available and a realistic assessment of what works best. But while they talked about paths and rewards, dialogue, sound, art, motivation, illusion, moods, settings and direction — nobody said anything about the workings of the game itself and the value of that or its impact. I was left wondering why not. CRPGs are games, after all.

Scott Bennie's response in particular omitted game-play from the list of things that establish mood. How can that be? Games themselves establish mood, and not just computer games. Why shouldn't these? Why should CRPG have the same limitations as a book or a film? Why should they rely soley on dialogue, sound and art to create mood? Isn't that the essential difference between this medium and the others? There's no game being played in a film, no game in a book…

IMHO, it's because they all accept the current paradigm as inevitable. But I think CRPG has reached an impasse and needs to be reconsidered. Game designers need a to find a better way to approach CRPG, a way that will better utilize today's processing power and free up the potential for storytelling and role play.
Last edited by Squeek; May 18th, 2007 at 22:33.
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