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June 8th, 2007, 01:15
He's got a very valid point here, and though I've not played Pikman, I think it describes the essence of how games become addictive:

Often, there is only one "right" way to navigate to the goal, but the player does still have to figure it out. And because the solution can be deduced logically, players typically feel smart -- not dumb -- when they do so. Additionally, the game requires enough moment-to-moment skill in managing Pikmin that player talent is also very rewarding.
Life, parents, spouses and jobs often neglect to tell us how smart we are(sometimes, it's true, with good reason ), or reward us in a meaningful way for our skills. A good game can and does.
Where there's smoke, there's mirrors.
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