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June 9th, 2007, 04:52
Originally Posted by Unre View Post
A kind of entertainment makes us adict with the combination of game-play and ego-stroaking reward? His co-worker, Avellon also mentioned the importance of ego-stroaking. And somehow, I think he meant not only power-gamers.

I think critical thinking is more of common sence and feel bit patronized but I guess a part of his intention is to point out too many gamers mix up their tastes with game mechanics. He made a good point by mentioning ego-stroaking factor. Some gamers feel smarter only because they play games of their liking. Watch out how your favourite games play with your mind! But as a game-designer, isn't he responsible for it?
Hope I'm understanding you, Unre. Please correct me if I'm not, but I don't know that I see being properly led by the developer through the game play to a correct conclusion as ego-stroking per se.

To me that's more like the constant adulation of NPC's for completing minor quests ("Oh thank you great hero for killing all the nasty rats and taking my sister in the next village our father's flute! Only one with the bloodline of the Gods could have done that!!") and the tired cliche's of the Chosen One,etc that permeate the RPG mythos.

I think the moment a game starts to truly interest you beyond just passing time is the moment when it connects with your ability to reason things out, when you realize you get it and you can beat it if you apply your brain to it. Making this happen— beating the game with a sufficient amount of mental investment— is where the "reward" part comes in; if it's too easy, then it becomes meaningless and if it's too hard it becomes frustrating.

And if it's 'just right', i.e., challenging and difficult enough, it becomes addictive, or something you enjoy repeating anyway because you are rewarded with success for figuring it out. IMHO, that is .

Where there's smoke, there's mirrors.
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