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October 5th, 2008, 12:20
Originally Posted by coyote View Post
How realistic is it when your aim is shaking over one third of the screen with an assault rifle while you are perfectly steady with a pistol?
I don't think that you've understood the weight mechanisms of weapons.

My weapon experience is actually very limited, but what I can say for sure is that the "overweight" on the "long distance" of a rifle is what makes the "shaking".

In better words, meanwhile the weight of a pistol is limited to a rather limited and "short" spot (an pistol is rather short compared to a rifle),

the weight of a rifle is dispersed along a long bar of metal and wood.

The points nearer to your own body are firm - that's why it is so with the pistol - but the points far away from the body need a constand shifting of the muscles to hold them right.

Meanwhile we are nrmally used to pick up and hold things that are close to the body - a mug, let's say - we are normally *not* used to pick up and hold upright things like a hayfork.

From the longth-weight point of view, a hayfork is similar to a rifle, but different, too.

A hayfork has its actual "heavy" weight at the end, whereas the rifle has it distributed along the long bar of metal & wood. From this point of view, holding a hayfork upright and straight is on the one hand more difficult (especially for the untrained) and easier (once you know how it's done), because if the "right" muscles you need for it.

Especially untrained people will have difficulties to use "the right muscles" in their arms to hold a rifle upright, because they have not trained muscles they need for this.
For experienced rifle-users, this is easier, because of the training of the right muscles.

"Pin-pointing" towards a target with a rifle is like pointing with a heavy needle towards it, in my eyes. The handle of it will be steady and firm ('cause it's close to the body), but the very end of the "needle" is zig-zagging because it IS the very end. This requires and considerable amount of fine tuning with your muscles, which is only achieved during training.
Especially this fine tuning makes it so difficult.

In a way it can be compared to painting miniatures: Some people have perfectly still hands for that,
others don't. I don't have 'em.

Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction. (E.F.Schumacher, Economist, Source)
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