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Default Seriously, do these politicians never learn ?

April 7th, 2012, 06:04
If you thought having the Obama government fall back about SOPA and PIPA was a decisive victory, you were wrong from the very beginning.

Let’s keep it short, you’re welcome to rage and yell in real life, please :

- The Obama government is trying to bring SOPA back in action

1. http://act.demandprogress.org/sign/n…x6cvT&rd=1&t=4

The next two deal with the same law called CISPA.

- New law giving agencies freedom to breach into all of your privacy regarding what you do online, and freedom of the agencies intercepting that information to share their harvest with any other organization they wish. This is not voted on yet but the vote is soon.

1. http://www.infowars.com/house-commit…-sharing-bill/

- Freedom for companies to monitor your online activities and liberally censor everything you do. This is not voted on yet but the vote is soon.

1. http://www.infowars.com/cispa-hr-3523-the-new-sopa/

Seems that future vision of a police state is looking more real every year.

"Beware the potato for he is easily angered."- Couchpotato
Last edited by Couchpotato; April 7th, 2012 at 06:38.
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April 7th, 2012, 06:19
I just love the government infringing on my personal freedom.
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April 7th, 2012, 22:32
A Psychologist said to me last week : "Studies have shown that in closed systems, people are capable of making incredibly naive and dumb decistions."

And he explicitely meant politicians' councils, too.

And probably Lobbyists try to benefit from that "law" and explocitely try to infuse THEIR point of view into these "closed circles".

Because that Psychologist also said that "it needs input from the outside to get to better solutions" (and I'd add : "intelligent solutions"), so that's why I'm thinking that Lobbyists are aware of that phenomenon and deliberately try NOT to let "fresh air" come into these circles (which are domonated by them) !

Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction. (E.F.Schumacher, Economist, Source)
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April 7th, 2012, 23:05
Infowars is pure trash!

On-topic: Isn't it better to leave this with the NSA who already got your surveilance covered?
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April 8th, 2012, 11:13
Since I'm on this topic I also found this-

The console of your PlayStation, Xbox or Wii is set to be the next frontier of intelligence gathering, writes Michael Peck, gaming editor at Foreign Policy magazine.

Recent years have brought reports of the US government eavesdropping on phone conversations, emails, even tweets - all in the name of fighting terrorism. But surely your Xbox must be safe from the prying eyes of Big Brother?

Not for long. You might not immediately think that slaying dragons or driving like a maniac through virtual streets is all that interesting to intelligence agents, but the US government believes there might be law-enforcement gold on your Xbox.

Government researchers say that hacking into consoles will allow police to catch paedophiles and terrorists. Meanwhile, privacy advocates worry that gamers may leave sensitive data - and not just credit card information - on their Nintendos without knowing it.
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At the cutting edge of this development is Obscure Technologies, a small San Francisco-based company that performs computer forensics and which has just been given a $US177,237 ($172,250) sole-source research contract to develop ''hardware and software tools that can be used for extracting data from video-game systems'', and ''a collection of data (disk images; flash memory dumps; configuration settings) extracted from new video-game systems and used game systems purchased on the secondary market'', according to the contract award from the US Navy. (Law enforcement agencies contacted the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate for help on a tool to examine gaming console data. The department then asked the US Naval Postgraduate School to execute the contract and spearhead the research because of the expertise of Simson Garfinkel, a computer science associate professor at the NPS in California - hence the US Navy contract.)

The project, called the ''Gaming Systems Monitoring and Analysis Project'', originated in 2008, when law enforcement authorities were concerned about paedophiles using video-game consoles to find victims.

''Today's gaming systems are increasingly being used by criminals as a primary tool in exploiting children and, as a result, are being recovered by US law enforcement organisations during court-authorised searches,'' says Garfinkel, a computer forensics expert. Indeed, the FBI warns that paedophiles often use online gaming forums as their hunting grounds.

However ''there is a suspicion'' that terrorists are also using online games to communicate, John Verrico, spokesman for the Science and Technology Directorate, says.

The ultimate goal is to ''improve the current state-of-the-art of computer forensics by developing new tools for extracting information from popular game systems, and by building a corpus of data from second-hand game systems that can be used to further the development of computer forensic tools,'' Garfinkel says. Though the research is being overseen by the NPS, the contract award states that the tools developed by Obscure will be delivered to the department.

Monitoring gaming consoles is harder than you might think. Consoles such as the Microsoft Xbox 360, Sony Playstation 3 and Nintendo Wii encrypt their devices to prevent piracy and tampering.

Indeed, the contract states that ''analysis of the game systems requires specific knowledge of working with the hardware of embedded systems that have significant anti-tampering technology''. But this is more than hacking; the government wants tools that can apply computer forensics, which look for legally admissible evidence, to consoles.

While there have been some attempts to use computer forensics on consoles, researchers say this is relatively new ground. The department's project is ''exploratory research and development'', the Obscure Technologies president, Greg May, says. ''It will be interesting to see, because it's new to us as well. A lot of this stuff hasn't been done. We're not sure how complicated it is.''

Of course, what the government is interested in is not the game itself, but the platform - and the way you use it. Video-game consoles have evolved beyond simple entertainment machines into powerful all-purpose devices that are used to watch movies, post on Facebook, or - more important to an FBI or CIA agent - chat with other players.

''You wouldn't intentionally store sensitive data on a console,'' Parker Higgins, a spokesman for the online privacy group, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, says. ''But I can think of things like connection logs and conversation logs that are incidentally stored data. And it's even more alarming because users might not know that the data is created.

''These consoles are being used as general purpose computers,'' Higgins adds. ''The Xbox has a very active online community where people communicate. It stands to reason that you could get sensitive and private information stored on the console.''

Think about it: your Nintendo Wii may tell government investigators when you were connected to the internet, who you were talking to, what you were saying and what you were playing. ''Taken in context, it could end up revealing more than you expect,'' Higgins warns. There have already been hacks that could allow for spying on users of the Xbox Kinect, a video-enabled add-on that reads body movement for interactive gaming.

The department is aware of domestic privacy issues in the US, which is why it says it intends to target consoles from overseas. ''This project requires the purchasing of used video-game systems outside the US in a manner that is likely to result in their containing significant and sensitive information from previous users,'' the contract states.

So will console-game manufacturers co-operate with government efforts to break into their devices or will they construct bigger and better firewalls? Microsoft, Sony, Nintendo and the Entertainment Software Association did not respond to questions from the US magazine Foreign Policy, but the Electronic Frontier Foundation's Higgins believes the issue of console privacy and security has been neglected because consoles are dismissed as gaming toys. ''Just because it's a form associated with games doesn't mean it deserves less privacy protection.''

Gamers may not have much choice in the matter. Unlike regular computers, whose users can install security software, gamers can't just install an anti-virus program such as McAfee or spyware monitoring software.

In an era when the US National Security Agency can conduct warrantless electronic searches of your email, it is naive to assume that video games would be exempt.

There is a powerful case to be made for giving the government the technical means to collect evidence from consoles. There is also good reason to worry. Numerous cases of illegal wiretaps, as well as surveillance of various political and ethnic groups for dubious reasons, are grounds for suspicion. And who knows whether some violent trash talk by a teenage video gamer will trigger an alarm in a government surveillance computer?
You heard them think of the children and the terrorists.

"Beware the potato for he is easily angered."- Couchpotato
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April 9th, 2012, 05:01
Originally Posted by hishadow View Post
Infowars is pure trash!

On-topic: Isn't it better to leave this with the NSA who already got your surveilance covered?
at least you could smell a bit of the stinking reality instead of the MSM coolaid.
take a sniff here,
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NO24XmP1c5E

But the question is, do we, the voters ever learn?

"A strong president, means having the strength to resist the temptation of taking all that power isn't yours" - Ron Paul

"If you think the problems we create are bad, just wait until you see our solutions",- Government
Last edited by mudsling3; April 9th, 2012 at 06:42.
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April 10th, 2012, 07:05
Originally Posted by mudsling3 View Post
at least you could smell a bit of the stinking reality instead of the MSM coolaid.
take a sniff here,
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NO24XmP1c5E

But the question is, do we, the voters ever learn?
No because its coming and we can't stop it. Don't you want to live and die for the state. I wonder were the next war will happen. Iran or Syria probably.

"Beware the potato for he is easily angered."- Couchpotato
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April 10th, 2012, 14:22
voters never learn , it is an axiom
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