|
Your continuous donations keep RPGWatch running!
RPGWatch Forums » General Forums » Politics, Religion & other Controversies » Greek gov't bonds downgraded to junk status, Eurozone in trouble

Default Greek gov't bonds downgraded to junk status, Eurozone in trouble

September 11th, 2011, 18:55
There can be no doubt that Euro is in trouble but I don't think it's a bad thing. Euro (and the whole of European financial policy) needed a stress test and nothing tests currency better than genuine, deep, financial crisis. If Euro survives, it will be better for it. If not, than it wasn't worth having in the first place.
zahratustra is offline

zahratustra

SasqWatch

#401

Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 2,417

Default 

September 11th, 2011, 19:02
And if the stupid Frenchs knew about Germany's history, they'd oppose to the idea of the unification with Germany as the founders. I'm glad they learned about their mistakes for hearing Germany out. We still haven't and can't forgive Germany for the WWII's monstrosities toward other countries, especially Greece. I wish they could create Euro in democratic ways, not in Nazistic ways.
Tanno is offline

Tanno

Tanno's Avatar
Sentinel

#402

Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Thessaloniki, Greece
Posts: 270

Default 

September 11th, 2011, 19:06
Originally Posted by Tanno View Post
We still haven't and can't forgive Germany for the WWII's monstrosities toward other countries, especially Greece. I wish they could create Euro in democratic ways, not in Nazistic ways.
I'm somewhat in doubt if this actually violates Godwin's Law. Any experts who'd like to comment?
hishadow is offline

hishadow

Level N+1

#403

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Southern parts of Norway
Posts: 1,140

Default 

September 11th, 2011, 19:29
Originally Posted by Tanno View Post
And if the stupid Frenchs knew about Germany's history, they'd oppose to the idea of the unification with Germany as the founders. I'm glad they learned about their mistakes for hearing Germany out. We still haven't and can't forgive Germany for the WWII's monstrosities toward other countries, especially Greece. I wish they could create Euro in democratic ways, not in Nazistic ways.
I'm German (born 1968), so I reply this:

1) The unification of Germany was a good thing, because it was the end of the cold war. The cold war was expensive and if the cold war would have changed in a hot third world war it would have been the end of Europe.

2) The current German generation has nothing to do with old Nazi crimes. If you cannot forgive crimes two generations ago, YOU are the source of new prejudices and hate.

3) The Euro was never a German idea or in any way appreciated by the German people or by the specialists of the old Bundesbank.
It was a politicians idea (imho a bad idea) to push the idea of a unified Eurozone.

4) The best solution to this currency problem is:
Denmark, the Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Austria and Germany create a new currency (Deutschmark , maybe) and leave the Eurozone.
Exports would be more difficult, but the monetary sector would have much more stability.
The other countries can stay with the Euro.

For every complex problem, there is a solution that is simple, neat, and wrong. - HL Mencken
HiddenX is offline

HiddenX

HiddenX's Avatar
The Elder Spy
RPGWatch Donor

#404

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: NRW/Germany
Posts: 4,425

Default 

September 11th, 2011, 20:32
I agree about your first 3 points HiddenX. Especially the second one. As a Pole I could have come up with all sorts of grievances towards Germans but (despite what the Bible says) you simply can't visit sins of the fathers (or grandfathers) upon the sons. Just like you can't build the future when you are rooted in the past.
zahratustra is offline

zahratustra

SasqWatch

#405

Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 2,417

Default 

September 11th, 2011, 21:03
@zahratustra

I followed the movement of Solidarność in the 80's very closely. For me it was the begin of end of the Sovjet Union. I have deep respect for the Polish people; without major help from the outside you've done very well to build a better Poland with emerging markets.

Our pastor from the local church organized aid deliveries with us confirmees to Poland in the early 80's. Most of my neighbors, in particular the older ones, contributed a lot of food and clothes. We hoped that we could help a little bit back then.

For every complex problem, there is a solution that is simple, neat, and wrong. - HL Mencken
HiddenX is offline

HiddenX

HiddenX's Avatar
The Elder Spy
RPGWatch Donor

#406

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: NRW/Germany
Posts: 4,425

Default 

September 11th, 2011, 21:35
Originally Posted by HiddenX View Post
I'm German (born 1968), so I reply this:

1) The unification of Germany was a good thing, because it was the end of the cold war. The cold war was expensive and if the cold war would have changed in a hot third world war it would have been the end of Europe.

2) The current German generation has nothing to do with old Nazi crimes. If you cannot forgive crimes two generations ago, YOU are the source of new prejudices and hate.

3) The Euro was never a German idea or in any way appreciated by the German people or by the specialists of the old Bundesbank.
It was a politicians idea (imho a bad idea) to push the idea of a unified Eurozone.

4) The best solution to this currency problem is:
Denmark, the Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Austria and Germany create a new currency (Deutschmark , maybe) and leave the Eurozone.
Exports would be more difficult, but the monetary sector would have much more stability.
The other countries can stay with the Euro.
Interesting, considering that the German banking system de facto controls the EU economy. I believe the general consensus (here in the US) is that Germany benefits financially in the end, regardless of the costs of instability in other EU states.

But the problem with the Euro has always been the inability of each state to manipulate their own economy, and Germany has the financial horsepower to to control the Euro to the benefit of Germany. Germany probably shouldn't divest itself of that kind of power.
Jhari is offline

Jhari

Watchdog

#407

Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 192

Default 

September 11th, 2011, 22:02
My belief is that countries which share the same currency should be very similar in fiscal politics, monetary politics and life standard.
I can't see this in the current Eurozone.

@Jhari
Most Germans have absolute no interest to control or lead Europe - we have enough own problems to solve.

For every complex problem, there is a solution that is simple, neat, and wrong. - HL Mencken
HiddenX is offline

HiddenX

HiddenX's Avatar
The Elder Spy
RPGWatch Donor

#408

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: NRW/Germany
Posts: 4,425

Default 

September 11th, 2011, 23:06
I also believe that Germany benefits in the end from Eurozone compared to other european countries. That comes with no bad criticism as all countries would want that.

As for Germany leading or controling europe, well, no one means the average citizen but higher political authorities.
akarthis is offline

akarthis

Sentinel

#409

Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: athens
Posts: 300

Default 

September 11th, 2011, 23:31
Germany can sell things easier in Europe with a common currency. That's true,
but the average german tax-payer has nothing from this, if he has to subsidize other countries for years, so that Germany can sell goods to them.

Besides the biggest growing markets are not in Europe, they are in China and India.

Germany is NOT a strong economy because of the Euro, Germany is a strong economy because:
1) we produce high price quality products
2) we have very strong labor unions that cooperate with industry managers
3) since 1990 we exchange wage sacrifices for job security
4) we do everything to produce more efficiently than everybody else
5) we seek price stability, social and fiscal justice

Economic growth based on debts is often a short time party and at the same time a crime against our childeren.

For every complex problem, there is a solution that is simple, neat, and wrong. - HL Mencken
Last edited by HiddenX; September 11th, 2011 at 23:43.
HiddenX is offline

HiddenX

HiddenX's Avatar
The Elder Spy
RPGWatch Donor

#410

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: NRW/Germany
Posts: 4,425

Default 

September 12th, 2011, 00:00
Originally Posted by akarthis View Post
As for Germany leading or controling europe, well, no one means the average citizen but higher political authorities.
Mrs. Merkels party - the CDU - has lost elections in 5 federal states of Germany since the begin of the Euro crisis.
If she continues to waste tax-payers money for Europe, then she'll not be elected again and her junior partners the F.D.P. will fall into unimportance for a long time.

For every complex problem, there is a solution that is simple, neat, and wrong. - HL Mencken
HiddenX is offline

HiddenX

HiddenX's Avatar
The Elder Spy
RPGWatch Donor

#411

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: NRW/Germany
Posts: 4,425

Default 

September 12th, 2011, 01:31
Originally Posted by HiddenX View Post
. Most of my neighbors, in particular the older ones, contributed a lot of food and clothes. We hoped that we could help a little bit back then.
You certainly did During student strikes of 1980s we were occupying Collegium Novum of Jagiellonian University we were getting food parcels from abroad (Germany among them) this not only let us carry on as long as we did but it was also good to know that there were people who care about our plight.
zahratustra is offline

zahratustra

SasqWatch

#412

Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 2,417

Default 

September 12th, 2011, 04:40
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/goodby…-hello-drachma
A few months ago, when Zero Hedge first broke the news that the Drachma is trading at several major banks on a "when issued" basis at the client's request, it was promptly dismissed. Alas, it may be time to dismiss the dismissal, after Spiegel reports that as one of the scenarios considered for a Greek default, Germany anticipates the reintroduction of the drachma by the pathological liars at the Greek parliament. Yes: the currency that Greece was so happy to jettison 10 years ago when after the assistance of Goldman to hide its bloated debt, to much pomp and circumstance it entered the soon to be defunct Eurozone, is coming baaaaack.

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/german…ocedure-countr
Greece may not file for bankruptcy this weekend… But its time is coming - it is a 100% certainty. And throwing just that little more fuel into the fire is Germany's Economy Minister Philipp Roesler who in an op-ed posted in Die Welt, is once again planting the seeds for the inevitable day when that perpetual transgressor Greece (which just announced yet more tax hikes, and as a result can now shut down its economy as the tsunami of 24 hour strike will be unprecedented) is finally kicked out of the union. The question then, as now, will be: what next?
Michael Ellis is offline

Michael Ellis

Michael Ellis's Avatar
Watcher

#413

Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 63

Default 

September 12th, 2011, 13:25
Originally Posted by Tanno View Post
We still haven't and can't forgive Germany for the WWII's monstrosities toward other countries, especially Greece. I wish they could create Euro in democratic ways, not in Nazistic ways.
Being from a country that has been occupied by Germany, I find this comment to be stupid. How can you blame the current Germans for the acts committed 65 years (and more) in the past. Germany as a nation and its inhabitants can and should in no way be compared to the Germany of WWII or held responsible for the acts committed then.

I agree with what HiddenX said in his response, although I doubt item 4 will ever happen

Computer n. A machine which flawlessly performs the instructions it is given, no matter how flawed those instructions may be.
Myrthos is offline

Myrthos

Myrthos's Avatar
Cave Canem
Super Moderator
RPGWatch Team

#414

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Netherlands
Posts: 4,449

Default 

September 13th, 2011, 04:30
Myrthos, the answer is that: Of all the countries being compensated from Germany for its Nazistic monstrosities, Greece is the only country, who has yet to be compensated for their crimes. We do not have problems with you guys, but first we want to erase the black history of this WWII in order to be at peace with everyone. The same also goes for Turkey.

You have to understand that of all the countries, both Germany and Turkey annihilated our co-patriots' grandpas and grandmas, stole our goods(In Germany's case, the Nazis stole 75 billion euro from our gold) and a lot of bad things, resulting of Greece being the only victim.

That's why now at this time, the Hage's court is about to judge for those crimes.
Tanno is offline

Tanno

Tanno's Avatar
Sentinel

#415

Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Thessaloniki, Greece
Posts: 270

Default 

September 13th, 2011, 07:31
@Tanno

In 1960 there was reparation agreement over 115 Million Deutsche Mark.

Since 1960 Greece received ca. 34 Billion Euros through the EU transfer mechanisms direct from Germany.

The current (year 2010) greek debt to Germany is 43 Billion Euros - with IMHO a zero chance to get it back, ever.

So you still ask for more ? This is ridiculous.

***

When I loan a neighbour money I need a foundation of trust.
Greece is doing everything at the moment to lose trust.

For every complex problem, there is a solution that is simple, neat, and wrong. - HL Mencken
HiddenX is offline

HiddenX

HiddenX's Avatar
The Elder Spy
RPGWatch Donor

#416

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: NRW/Germany
Posts: 4,425

Default 

September 13th, 2011, 11:54
A very good article (in German) about the whole situation.

Zur Person:
Dirk Müller
Der gelernte Bankkaufmann Dirk Müller (auch bekannt als "Mr. Dax") handelt ab 1992 Anleihen für die Deutsche Bank an der Frankfurter Börse. 1998 wechselt er zum Wertpapierhändler ICF und war damit für die Kursfestsetzung zuständig. Seit 2008 ist er nur noch zeitweilig an der Börse und arbeitet unter anderem als Publizist.


Interview zur Krise in Griechenland
"Diese Kredite werden niemals zurückgezahlt"

Gebannt starren derzeit die Börsen auf Griechenlands Parlament, trotz der geringen Wirtschaftsleistung des Landes: Das zeigt, wie groß das Misstrauen gegen den Euro ist. Dabei ist klar, dass es einen klaren Schuldenschnitt geben wird, sagt Börsenexperte Dirk Müller.

tagesschau.de: Im griechischen Parlament wurde am Mittwoch das neue Sparpaket von Ministerpräsident Giorgos Papandreou verabschiedet. Wird das die internationalen Finanzmärkte beruhigen?


Dirk Müller: Die Märkte hatten bereits fest darauf gesetzt, dass der Sparkurs abgesegnet wird. Die griechischen Parlamentarier mussten schon im eigenen Interesse dafür stimmen, sonst hätten sie sich ja gleich einen neuen Job suchen können. Aber die große Frage ist natürlich: Was bringt das Ganze noch? Wird damit noch irgendein Problem gelöst? Nein, es wird nur in die Zukunft verschoben und es ist noch nicht einmal klar, wie lange die Probleme noch vertagt werden können.


tagesschau.de: Wie meinen Sie das?

Müller: Das hat doch längst absolut groteske Züge angenommen: Die weltweiten Börsen von Tokio über Hongkong und Europa bis in die USA starren ganz gebannt auf die Abstimmung im kleinen Griechenland, in dem nur 0,2 Prozent der Weltbevölkerung leben und was gerade einmal die Wirtschaftsleistung von Hessen hat. Das zeigt doch, dass es hier längst nicht mehr nur um ein Land, sondern um den Euro als Ganzes geht - und dessen Zukunft wird nicht in Athen geregelt werden.

tagesschau.de: Sie haben jüngst gesagt, dass das weitere Zahlen von Steuergeldern an Griechenland "an Veruntreuung grenzt", wie meinen Sie das?

Müller: Es ist doch jedem namhaften Experten klar, dass das Land diese Kredite niemals zurückzahlen wird. Wie denn auch? In dieser jetzt so verfahrenen Situation wird es auf eine teilweise Umschuldung oder einen klaren Schuldenschnitt - einen sogenannten Haircut - hinauslaufen. Und dennoch wollen wir jetzt noch einmal Geld nachschießen, ich finde, dass das Ganze schon einmal überprüft werden müsste.

"Vor einem Jahr hätte es noch Alternativen gegeben"

tagesschau.de: Wie hätte denn verhindert werden könne, dass es so weit kommt?

Müller: Vor einem Jahr hätte es noch Alternativen gegeben: eine komplette Abschirmung Griechenlands. Die Europäische Union hätte damals uneingeschränkt für die Anleihen des Landes garantieren müssen. Damit wären die Spekulationen aus dem Markt gewesen und die EU hätte das auch ohne Probleme stemmen können. Parallel hätte man einen kompletten "Umbauplan" für Griechenland aufstellen müssen, vergleichbar dem Marshall-Plan. Also eine umfassende Strategie, die dem Land zu einem nachhaltigen Geschäftsmodell verhilft, angelegt auf zehn oder 15 Jahre.

Die lange Laufzeit hätte geholfen, dass sich die Industrie, aber auch die Menschen darauf einstellen können. Diese Chance wurde aber vertan. Stattdessen haben wir das Land gezwungen, sich in die Katastrophe zu sparen. Jetzt ist klar: Es muss einen klaren Schuldenschnitt geben.

tagesschau.de: Wie würde das ablaufen?

Müller: Griechenland müsste raus aus dem Euro, abwerten und seine Schulden zumindest zum Teil streichen. Das wäre natürlich nicht einfach, danach hätte das Land dann aber die Chanche, sich neu zu erfinden: Es könnt sich mit Hilfe der abgewerteten eigenen Währung wieder auf seine Stärken besinnen, die vor allem im Dienstleistungsbereich wie dem Tourismus liegen. Schließlich entsprechen die griechischen Exporte gerade einmal sechs Prozent der Wirtschaftsleistung!

Mit einer niedrigen Währung, die der tatsächlichen Wirtschaftsleistung entspricht, würde es sich auch wieder lohnen in Griechenland Urlaub zu machen. Ganz im Gegensatz zu heute - denn momentan sind andere Länder deutlich billiger, was natürlich auch mehr Touristen anzieht. Zudem müsste die Verwaltung und Wirtschaft des Landes umgekrempelt werden.

"Ein Fass ohne Boden"

tagesschau.de: Das klingt so einfach. Tatsächlich lässt sich doch nur schwer abschätzen, was passieren würde, wenn wir den Euro, also die Währungsunion einfach aufgeben?

Müller: Das lässt sich natürlich nicht vollkommen abschätzen. Aber momentan versuchen wir alles, um ein System zusammen zu halten, das sich so nicht zusammenhalten lässt. Stattdessen könnten wir das Geld auch dazu verwenden, um Verwerfungen nach einer Reform abzufangen: Damit könnten beispielsweise Banken in dieser schwierigen Phase rekapitalisiert werden - wie wir es mit der Commerzbank in der Finanzkrise gemacht haben. So könnten dann auch die Zahlungsströme aufrecht erhalten werden. Ich denke, dass da das Geld viel besser aufgehoben wäre, als - was wir jetzt gerade machen - es in einem Fass ohne Boden zu versenken.

tagesschau.de: Allein die EZB hält ja mittlerweile Griechenland-Papiere in zweistelliger Milliardenhöhe. Für diese müsste bei einem Schuldenschnitt letztendlich auch der Steuerzahler geradestehen?

Müller: Das ist ohnehin schon der Fall, weil wir unsere privaten Banken in den vergangenen Monaten weitgehend aus dem Risiko entlassen haben. Das was wirklich noch bei deutschen Banken liegt, betrifft doch die Hypo Real Estate oder die KfW, also Finanzinstitute, für die auch wiederum der Steuerzahler geradesteht. Die Bürger müssen so oder so zahlen, aber wenn wir jetzt noch weitere Krediten draufpacken, dann wird er diese letztendlich auch noch zahlen müssen. Die Frage ist nicht ob, sondern wann und wieviel - das Geld ist eh weg.
"Die Politik nimmt keiner mehr ernst"

tagesschau.de: Sie kennen die Börse, wie kommt dort der Zickzack-Kurs - insbesondere der deutschen - Politik an?


Müller: Das nimmt doch keiner mehr ernst! Das kann man einfach nicht mehr ernst nehmen: Das sind Getriebene, die gar nicht wissen, was sie da eigentlich machen. Es ist natürlich eine schwierige Situation, die sich nur schwer abschätzen lässt, aber es kann doch nicht sein, dass sich die Politik die Konzepte von denen schreiben lässt, die sie stattdessen lieber in die Pflicht nehmen sollte. Dann muss man sich nicht mehr wundern, wenn abenteuerliche Dinge dabei rauskommen.

tagesschau.de: Wie beurteilen Sie die Rolle der Rating-Agenturen?

Müller: Ich glaube "skandalös" wäre noch eine maßlose Untertreibung. Es ist ein Unding, was da passiert! Ich kann einfach nicht verstehen, wieso sich die Europäische Zentralbank mit all ihrem Fachwissen und den Experten bei ihren Entscheidungen von privaten US-Firmen abhängig macht. Das kann mir niemand erklären. Die Ratingagenturen verfolgen schließlich sowohl eigene Interessen, als auch Interessen der USA.

"Wir hechten von Blase zu Blase"

tagesschau.de: Was können wir aus der Griechenland-Krise lernen?

Müller: Darüber ließen sich viele Bücher schreiben: Zunächst einmal müssten wir massiv die Spekulationen aus dem Markt nehmen, die Macht der Ratingagenturen muss gebrochen werden. Zudem müssen wir einsehen, dass die Währungsunion in ihrer jetzigen Form nicht funktionieren kann. Wir müssen das System ohnehin neu aufstellen weil die Verschuldung eine Grenze erreicht hat, die nicht mehr tragfähig ist. Das gilt nicht nur für Griechenland, sondern für sämtliche OECD-Staaten.

Wir sind an einem Punkt angelangt, in dem wir von einer Blase zur nächsten Blase hechten. Es muss einfach mal wieder eine Umverteilung von oben nach unten geben. Dass das alle paar Jahrzehnte passieren muss, liegt in der Natur unseres Wirtschaftssystems.

tagesschau.de: Könnte Eurobonds eine Lösung sein, damit künftig weniger gegen einzelne Staaten spekuliert wird?


Müller: Das wäre nur bei zwei Varianten sinnvoll: Eine wäre eine echte Transferunion, also so etwas wie die Vereinigten Staaten von Europa. In ihr müssten die erheblichen wirtschaftlichen Unterschiede durch direkte Transferzahlungen ausgeglichen werden. Das wäre dann mit dem Länderfinanzausgleich in Deutschland vergleichbar, wo ja auch beispielsweise Baden-Württemberg an das schwächere Saarland zahlt. Wir müssten uns aber bereit erklären, jedes Jahr Milliardenbeträge an Länder wie Griechenland zu zahlen, damit diese Länder mithalten können. Die andere Variante wäre eine Verkleinerung der Eurozone auf die wirtschaftlich starken Staaten, die dann eine Art "Nord-Euro" hätte.

"Nord-Euro" als Lösung der Krise?

tagesschau.de: Welche Staaten sollten Ihrer Meinung nach bei diesem Modell dabei sein?

Müller: Die wirtschaftlich starken Länder der Eurozone, also neben Deutschland Frankreich, Österreich die Benelux-Staaten und Finnland. Damit würde dann die neue Währung für Länder gelten, die halbwegs auf vergleichbarer Leistungsfähigkeit arbeiten und die sich daher auch viel enger abstimmen können. Das wäre eine superstarke Weltwährung.

Unterdessen könnten die anderen Länder der bisherigen Eurozone ihre eigenen Währungen wieder einführen und abwerten, sodass sie ihr Geschäftsmodell wieder aufbauen können. Denn egal wohin wir gucken, ob nach Griechenland, Irland, Portugal oder Spanien - diese Länder haben derzeit einfach kein Geschäftsmodell - zumindest nicht auf dieser hohen Euro-Basis.

tagesschau.de: Was glauben Sie wie es mit dem Euro weitergeht?


Müller: Meine Hoffnung wäre, dass wir einmal zu so etwas wie den Vereinigten Staaten von Europa kommen - mit einer gemeinsamen Währung. Allerdings müssten diese wesentlich demokratischer aufgestellt sein als die europäische Union in ihrer heutigen Form. Aber meine realistische Einschätzung - die eine eher optimistische ist - lautet, dass es auf den von mir beschriebenen "Nord-Euro" hinauslaufen wird.

For every complex problem, there is a solution that is simple, neat, and wrong. - HL Mencken
HiddenX is offline

HiddenX

HiddenX's Avatar
The Elder Spy
RPGWatch Donor

#417

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: NRW/Germany
Posts: 4,425

Default 

September 13th, 2011, 13:52
Originally Posted by Tanno View Post
Hear what happened just a week ago! Instead of being punished for the Siemens scandal, they got the prescription of their crimes(!!!), which means we're now the victims and need to pay for their OWN crimes and crisis(!), and what's worse, the Siemens shitholes don't want to admit the bribery towards the politicians(!).
Interesting that this bit doesn't appear here in German press right now.

I think I should write a letter to the editor of the local newspaper at least.

I do know, however, the general outline of the Siemens scandal.
The press reported about it here as well.


Edit : Very interesting is this part of the interview from above :

tagesschau.de: Sie kennen die Börse, wie kommt dort der Zickzack-Kurs - insbesondere der deutschen - Politik an?

Müller: Das nimmt doch keiner mehr ernst! Das kann man einfach nicht mehr ernst nehmen: Das sind Getriebene, die gar nicht wissen, was sie da eigentlich machen. Es ist natürlich eine schwierige Situation, die sich nur schwer abschätzen lässt, aber es kann doch nicht sein, dass sich die Politik die Konzepte von denen schreiben lässt, die sie stattdessen lieber in die Pflicht nehmen sollte. Dann muss man sich nicht mehr wundern, wenn abenteuerliche Dinge dabei rauskommen.

tagesschau.de: Wie beurteilen Sie die Rolle der Rating-Agenturen?

Müller: Ich glaube "skandalös" wäre noch eine maßlose Untertreibung. Es ist ein Unding, was da passiert! Ich kann einfach nicht verstehen, wieso sich die Europäische Zentralbank mit all ihrem Fachwissen und den Experten bei ihren Entscheidungen von privaten US-Firmen abhängig macht. Das kann mir niemand erklären. Die Ratingagenturen verfolgen schließlich sowohl eigene Interessen, als auch Interessen der USA.
The google-made translation sounds like this [partly corrected by me] :

tagesschau.de: You know the stock market, as there is the zigzag course - in politics - especially the German ones?

Müller: But nobody takes it [takes them : the politicians] seriously [anymore] ! This can simply no longer taken seriously: These [politicians] are driven ones, know not what they're doing. It is of course a difficult situation, which can be difficult to estimate, but it can not be true that the policy of the concepts can be written by those who should take the duty. Then you don't have to wonder when [why] these adventurous things come out of it.

tagesschau.de: How do you assess the role of credit rating agencies?

Mueller: I think "scandalous" would still be an understatement. It is an absurdity, what happened there! I just can not understand why the European Central Bank with all its expertise and experts in their is dependent in their decisions by private U.S. company. That no one can tell me. The rating agencies finally pursue both its own interests, as well as U.S. interests.

“ Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius – and a lot of courage – to move in the opposite direction.“ (E.F.Schumacher, Economist, Source)
Last edited by Alrik Fassbauer; September 13th, 2011 at 14:03.
Alrik Fassbauer is offline

Alrik Fassbauer

Alrik Fassbauer's Avatar
TL;DR

#418

Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Old Europe
Posts: 16,004

Default 

September 13th, 2011, 19:32
Mueller: I think "scandalous" would still be an understatement. It is an absurdity, what happened there! I just can not understand why the European Central Bank with all its expertise and experts in their is dependent in their decisions by private U.S. company. That no one can tell me. The rating agencies finally pursue both its own interests, as well as U.S. interests.
We certainly need to have independent non-profit rating agencies rather than privately owned agencies that have been corrupted.
Thrasher is offline

Thrasher

Thrasher's Avatar
Wheeee!
RPGWatch Donor

#419

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Studio City, CA
Posts: 10,129

Default 

September 20th, 2011, 15:48
Originally Posted by Thrasher View Post
We certainly need to have independent non-profit rating agencies rather than privately owned agencies that have been corrupted.
The problem is that the rating agencies have an inherent conflict of interest. They are paid by the companies they rate (I think they rate sovereign debt for free). There actually are several subscription based rating agencies that don't have this conflict of interest, a few that I have used in my portfolio work and I find to be very good, but they can't get the same certification as S&P and Moody's due to politics.

————————————————-

"Ya'll can go to HELL! I'm-a-goin' to TEXAS!"

- Davy Crockett
blatantninja is offline

blatantninja

blatantninja's Avatar
Resident Redneck Facist

#420

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: NYC
Posts: 4,122
RPGWatch Forums » General Forums » Politics, Religion & other Controversies » Greek gov't bonds downgraded to junk status, Eurozone in trouble
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

All times are GMT +2. The time now is 06:05.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright by RPGWatch