|
Your continuous donations keep RPGWatch running!
RPGWatch Forums » General Forums » Off-Topic » What are you reading ?

Default What are you reading ?

September 18th, 2007, 12:34
Seeing Lloyd Alexander's Prydain Chronicles mentioned certainly brings back some memories. These were the books that really sparked my interest in the fantasy genre when I read them as a child. I certainly recommend them to anyone age 11 and up.
As for more mature fiction, has anyone read The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant by Stephan Donaldson? I've heard some interesting but mixed reviews and am just deliberating whether I should give them a read.
Geist is offline

Geist

Watchdog

#321

Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 176

Default 

September 18th, 2007, 18:43
Read both sets of Covenant Chronicles many years ago. Not world-shaking, but good enough to keep me reading. Don't really remember enough about them to give a detailed review.

Finished "Trace" from Patricia Cornwell last night. Although the ending is a letdown (400 pages of buildup and the bad guy is caught in 3 pages?), the book was pretty enjoyable. There's not as much of Scarpetta wallowing in self-pity as the previous couple books in the series. There's still more of that self-hatred from all the characters than I really care for, but it's presented as incidental to the action this time around. Maybe Cornwell has her life back on track enough to stop whining thru her characters.

Started "Pawn of Prophesy" from David Eddings. It's been several years since I read the Belgariad and nothing in my book drawer was grabbing me, so I decided to try and wash the stench of the Dreamers series off the pedestal I keep for Eddings.

Sorry. No pearls of wisdom in this oyster.
Dallas Cowboys: *sigh* / / Detroit Red Wings: Took injuries to see them, but how about them youngsters!
dteowner is offline

dteowner

dteowner's Avatar
Shoegazer

#322

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Indiana, USA
Posts: 11,198

Default 

September 18th, 2007, 18:47
Originally Posted by dteowner View Post
Finished "Trace" from Patricia Cornwell last night. Although the ending is a letdown (400 pages of buildup and the bad guy is caught in 3 pages?), the book was pretty enjoyable.
My wife used to eat those up, but a couple of books ago got tired of (as she says) reading the same book over and over again … is that still the trend?

— Mike
txa1265 is offline

txa1265

txa1265's Avatar
SasqWatch

#323

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Corning, NY USA
Posts: 11,274

Default 

September 18th, 2007, 19:13
The "mystery" isn't all that much different than previous volumes, but it's more palatable without the extra helping of "woe is me" that was so prevalent. For a few books, the story was a minor sideline to all the character introspection. I don't know that I'd tell her to go buy it, though.

Sorry. No pearls of wisdom in this oyster.
Dallas Cowboys: *sigh* / / Detroit Red Wings: Took injuries to see them, but how about them youngsters!
dteowner is offline

dteowner

dteowner's Avatar
Shoegazer

#324

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Indiana, USA
Posts: 11,198

Default 

September 19th, 2007, 00:58
I enjoyed Donaldson's first couple of series, then went right off him.

If God said it, then that settles it!!

Editor@RPGWatch
Corwin is offline

Corwin

Corwin's Avatar
On The Razorblade of Life
RPGWatch Team

#325

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Australia
Posts: 10,254
Send a message via Skype™ to Corwin

Default 

September 28th, 2007, 02:34
Just finished The Other Boleyn Girl, by Philippa Gregory, quite a decent potboiler about Henry VII's sex life amidst the greedy and unscrupulous power brokers of Tudor England. Not excruciatingly historically accurate, yet neither is it a typical bodice-ripper.
Started The List of Seven, by Mark Frost and it's also a lot better than I expected. Well-written Victorian novel of the occult told through the persona of Conan Doyle, and presenting a Holmesian character called Jack Sparks. So many bad novels take this route that I really wouldn't have bought the book, but got it as a loan from a friend and it's surprisingly good.

Where there's smoke, there's mirrors.
magerette is offline

magerette

magerette's Avatar
Hedgewitch
RPGWatch Team

#326

Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 7,929

Default 

September 28th, 2007, 02:44
After I finish Golden Compass I need to go back and re-read 'Atlas Shrugged' based on the Bioshock discussion … heck, it has been at least 20 years since I touched it …

— Mike
txa1265 is offline

txa1265

txa1265's Avatar
SasqWatch

#327

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Corning, NY USA
Posts: 11,274

Default 

September 28th, 2007, 02:55
Originally Posted by txa1265 View Post
After I finish Golden Compass I need to go back and re-read 'Atlas Shrugged' based on the Bioshock discussion … heck, it has been at least 20 years since I touched it …
High school for me (40 years—EEK!) But it says a lot that I have a few rudimentary memories of it still. My last trip to the dollar book store, the proprietor and I got into a brief discussion about her as he had just bought in her whole opus, all the novels, tons of books of essays, etc. I almost bought a few, then decided, like you, that I could reread Atlas Shrugged and get the whole philosophy pretty much. Just rereading her most seminal novel would probably be more than enough of Ms Rand for me.

Where there's smoke, there's mirrors.
magerette is offline

magerette

magerette's Avatar
Hedgewitch
RPGWatch Team

#328

Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 7,929

Default 

September 28th, 2007, 03:02
Struggling with Erikson's Gardens of the Moon.

I'll see it through but its I'm not pleased with the intentionally vague dialog. There is mysterious and then there is obnoxious. Only on page 130, but the comparison to Martin is a bit of a stretch.

"For Innos!"
ToddMcF2002 is offline

ToddMcF2002

ToddMcF2002's Avatar
SasqWatch

#329

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Boston MA
Posts: 2,226

Default 

September 28th, 2007, 03:35
Rolled right into "Queen of Sorcery". I usually break up series when I read them, but so far the series still renews my faith in calling Eddings my favorite author.

Sorry. No pearls of wisdom in this oyster.
Dallas Cowboys: *sigh* / / Detroit Red Wings: Took injuries to see them, but how about them youngsters!
dteowner is offline

dteowner

dteowner's Avatar
Shoegazer

#330

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Indiana, USA
Posts: 11,198

Default 

October 15th, 2007, 06:30
In the last two months, I've read : Harry Potter 5 and 6 and around 140 of the 1rst Dragonlance Chronicles - Dragons of Autumn Twilight.

Started the 7th Harry Potter this week.
Am also reading The Dark Elf Trilogy (Salvatore) #1 - Homeland.
Almost done with this one. Read it around 15 years ago.

Keeping my mind active once more.

P.S. : And yes Todd, I stole your Avatar!!!
enodenroH is offline

enodenroH

enodenroH's Avatar
There is no spoon

#331

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Icewind Dale.
Posts: 407

Default 

October 15th, 2007, 18:53
I finished The List of Seven and was bothered by some familiar elements in its quirky Holmes/Doyle meets Madame Blavatsky/Lovecraft storyline, but found that this was explained when I got to the bio of the author on the back cover, Mark Frost, among his credits being Twin Peaks A good read if somewhat silly at times.
I've recently been exploring the world of Appalachia in Sharyn McCrumb's novels of a small Tenneesee community and its inhabitants, ghostly, criminal and historical. She's quite a good writer and brings a different focus to the mystery genre. Just finished The Rosewood Casket and recommend it to anyone who likes a little history, and the occasional ghost story thrown into their detective novel.

Where there's smoke, there's mirrors.
magerette is offline

magerette

magerette's Avatar
Hedgewitch
RPGWatch Team

#332

Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 7,929

Default 

October 18th, 2007, 00:26
I recently finished the third installment of Robin Hobb's latest trilogy. The book was called Renegade Magic, from the Soldier Son trilogy. With the completion of this book I have read all the four trilogies written by Hobb. Although this was a good trilogy, I was not as good as the Farseer trilogy and the Tawny Man trilogy, but it was better then the Liveship Traders trilogy. A very suprising, yet satisfying ending!

Neo: Be right back
Corwin: Ok

Neo: Back
Corwin: Front
Neo is offline

Neo

Neo's Avatar
Lonely Wolf

#333

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Holland
Posts: 116
Send a message via Skype™ to Neo

Default 

October 18th, 2007, 00:43
Yes I see my avatar has been "borrowed" LOL

I've got 100 pages or so left of Gardens of the Moon. Good enough to keep going with the series but it doesnt exactly grab me like I hoped. Has anyone else here read Erikson? Does it get better? The weakness I see is character development and too many characters. Martin certainly has too many characters but he flushes them out completely while Erikson sometimes doesnt even bother to physically describe some of them. After 100 pages he might mention a character has skin dark as night. That would have been nice to know. He fails to even describe whole races!

Erikson must really like Dune, another book that frustrates me to no end with lack of description.

"For Innos!"
ToddMcF2002 is offline

ToddMcF2002

ToddMcF2002's Avatar
SasqWatch

#334

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Boston MA
Posts: 2,226

Default 

October 26th, 2007, 10:59
Since I had to move to a small apartment for a temp job I dumped most of my library at my parents place in the countryside, and I miss the collection badly. I only brought some of my dads books (he ordered a bunch from the library of military history and some of them are interesting) and am currently reading "the battle for the Falklands" by Hastings & Jenkins. It gives an interesting account of a conflict I know little about, but the translation to Swedish is VERY stilted and the insights into the Argentinian side are minimal. In all it reminds me of many of the stuffs this Anglophile country swallows whole (sports news from English-speaking countries are also filled with horrible translations of wordplays that only make sense in English)…

I loved Dune and the two books after it, as well as "Chapter house". Books 4 and 5 in the series and all the spinoffs are crap though.
Zaleukos is offline

Zaleukos

Zaleukos's Avatar
Bum

#335

Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 1,863

Default 

October 27th, 2007, 19:20
Completed the Belgariad last night. While not quite as good as I remember, it was still an excellent read from my favorite author. Haven't decided what's up next.

Sorry. No pearls of wisdom in this oyster.
Dallas Cowboys: *sigh* / / Detroit Red Wings: Took injuries to see them, but how about them youngsters!
dteowner is offline

dteowner

dteowner's Avatar
Shoegazer

#336

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Indiana, USA
Posts: 11,198

Default 

October 29th, 2007, 22:04
Finished the last Potter at the begining of this week.
Could've been better. I preferred the Half Blood Prince.

Now, reading #2 of the Dark Elf Trilogy : EXILE.

Yes Drizzt, Kill them all!!!
enodenroH is offline

enodenroH

enodenroH's Avatar
There is no spoon

#337

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Icewind Dale.
Posts: 407

Default 

October 30th, 2007, 16:32
Finally got my hands on a copy of the Shadows over Baker Street anthology mentioned a few pages back; enjoyed it enormously. If you're a fan of Sherlock Holmes and/or Lovecraft, I would highly recommend it. Gaiman's Study in Emerald is excellent, but I also enjoyed the tale of Watson and his orderly Murray and their encounter in Afghanistan with the Weeping Ones, as well as Colonel Sebastian Moran and the burning metal tiger from beyond space and time. Good stuff.

Where there's smoke, there's mirrors.
magerette is offline

magerette

magerette's Avatar
Hedgewitch
RPGWatch Team

#338

Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 7,929

Default 

November 1st, 2007, 16:17
Ha, yeah — that one rocks. But I think you actually have to be a bit of a fan of *both* Holmes and Lovecraft to "get it" — otherwise the references are so bizarre that they'll probably fly right past you leaving you going WTF??? in a big way.
Prime Junta is offline

Prime Junta

RPGCodex' Little BRO

#339

Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 8,540

Default 

November 1st, 2007, 19:33
Very true—it's a blend that works well but you do have to appreciate both flavors.

Prime Junta wrote elsewhere:
Actually, I'd suggest you start with a commentary on Plato rather than the man himself. Plato's world was so different from our own that unless you're already really deep into it, you'll completely misunderstand him.
Rather than follow Corwin's red herring any further off topic in the Witcher thread, thought I'd ask if you had any particular commentary in mind here. There's no doubt in my mind that I could easily "completely misunderstand" or just plain fail to understand Greek philosophy, so it would have to be on the primer level, I'm afraid.
Actually, fiction would be even better, but I don't know if any exists.

Where there's smoke, there's mirrors.
magerette is offline

magerette

magerette's Avatar
Hedgewitch
RPGWatch Team

#340

Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 7,929
RPGWatch Forums » General Forums » Off-Topic » What are you reading ?
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

All times are GMT +2. The time now is 21:02.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright by RPGWatch