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September 3rd, 2013, 15:46
My brother made a history timeline website. He has put a lot of time into it and it is coming around nicely. For all you Civilization fans and history buffs check it out.

http://historiarex.com/

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September 3rd, 2013, 15:50
Check out the timeline on the homepage. He did get a degree in history so he knows a little bit about the subject. But he is a terrible gamer and I always crush him in Civ games

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September 3rd, 2013, 16:58
It looks good, I like the way the lines converge/diverge when there are conquests etc. A few thoughts:

1/ No South/Central America

2/ King Arthur & Excalibur? I'd drop these, it's a bit like including Robin Hood (another legend with the odd possible bit of truth thrown in).

3/ There is a random picture of Stonehenge in 600AD? That is a few thousand years too late, it is a prehistoric monument.

I like the fact that the USA is a tiny offshoot from the mighty British timeline
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September 3rd, 2013, 17:05
Really cool site, will pass along to my history-teacher friend

It's a fun idea, so I hope it takes off for him!
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September 3rd, 2013, 19:49
3/ There is a random picture of Stonehenge in 600AD? That is a few thousand years too late, it is a prehistoric monument. coaster

He has Stonehenge listed at 2500 B.C. It is at the top of the chart with a description.

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September 3rd, 2013, 21:27
The Beaker People, or whoever first built it, didn't have writing as far as we know. So really, that parts not "history".

The Beaker People, or whoever first built it, didn't have writing as far as we know. So really, that parts not "history".



Also, the Phoenicians built possibly the oldest city in the world, "Byblos" (its Greek name) which was later supplanted by Tyre and Sidon. I think that would be worth mentioning as well as the Canaanites and Jericho preceding Jerusalem and Carthage as a colony of Phoenicians.

I really like this timeline. I always wanted to do something like this for cRPG's.

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September 4th, 2013, 10:17
Originally Posted by Hastar
3/ There is a random picture of Stonehenge in 600AD? That is a few thousand years too late, it is a prehistoric monument. coaster

He has Stonehenge listed at 2500 B.C. It is at the top of the chart with a description.
Ah yes I missed the earlier picture…but not sure why Stonehenge reappears at 600AD next to King Arthur. Perhaps something like a reference to St Columbus might be a decent substitute.
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September 4th, 2013, 13:45
In an legend/fairytale it was told that Merlin had (re)built Stonehenge, probably that's why.

Current age speculations are set by the data Archaeologists got ffrom diggings there - within Stonehenge, there were found a few graves.

There's an fascinating film by the National Geographic about Stonehenge, too.
In it, an Archaeologist speculates that Stonehenge was originally part of two sites with different symbolic meanings.

Originally Posted by Lucky Day View Post
The Beaker People, or whoever first built it, didn't have writing as far as we know. So really, that parts not "history".

The Beaker People, or whoever first built it, didn't have writing as far as we know. So really, that parts not "history".

Yes, but their clay things can be dated using modern methods (photoluminiscence or how it is spelled).

And it was probably them who had built the very first instances of Stonehenge (Stonehenge was changed at least 3 times during the ages).

Apart from that, I really like this timeline.

Edit : Sorry for my grammar.

Edit : Regarding the Hittites … : It is possible that Troy was a member of the Hittites Empire .http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilusa This was deduced by linguists.
The German-language article is much more detailed. It mentions the Alaksandu-Treaty as well. Which is quite important for modern interpretations of where Wilusa once were.

Edit : Regarding the Scyths : There's an nice article on Wikipedia on them. Unfortunately I haven't been visiting any exhibitions about them during the last 10 years. Because my focus is elsewhere.
But - the knowledge about them has very much increased during the last 20 years, as far as I know !

What I really don't understand is this "LXX" sign ???

Edit : And the Etruscand need some work, too. They were natives, and becomes melted into Roman society.

I hold the obscure theory that they had actually been refugees from TRoy, according to a few points :

- Similarities to Lydian language & culture have been found.
- Troy was a part of Lydia.
- A stele has been found on Lemnos, with the language having similarities to early Etruscan language. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemnian_language
- The "Aeneid" was written so that it shows the journey of refugees from Troy to Rome.

To me, these are igns that a population might have fled from Toy to Italy and then founded Rome. Or at least founded a place to live there.
But - that's just my obscure theiry.

Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction. (E.F.Schumacher, Economist, Source)
Last edited by Alrik Fassbauer; September 4th, 2013 at 14:12.
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September 4th, 2013, 16:21
Originally Posted by Alrik Fassbauer View Post
In an legend/fairytale it was told that Merlin had (re)built Stonehenge, probably that's why.

Current age speculations are set by the data Archaeologists got ffrom diggings there - within Stonehenge, there were found a few graves.

There's an fascinating film by the National Geographic about Stonehenge, too.
In it, an Archaeologist speculates that Stonehenge was originally part of two sites with different symbolic meanings.
That would be Mike Parker-Pearson talking about Durrington Walls, a site just up the river. He's got the idea that Stonehenge was a place of the dead, while Durrington was a place to live. I've got friends who worked on that dig and, uh, consider some of his evidence a bit stretched, but it's as good a theory as any of them. Essentially, every academic prehistorian has their own pet theory and tends to ignore the others.

The really interesting bit about Stonehenge is that it's been reused, rebuilt, and repurposed over and over again for thousands of years, but everyone tends to go for a single theory to cover thousands of years of use. Even the Romans were hanging around doing something there. Hell, the Stonehenge we see is mostly a modern reconstruction. Unfortunately, it's so tainted with pseudohistory and New Age bullshit that it's hard to work with.
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September 4th, 2013, 19:42
I like to think that Stonehenge is where the pagans did their sacrifices. "God Bless those pagans," Homer Simpson.

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September 4th, 2013, 20:10
Originally Posted by Menigal View Post
That would be Mike Parker-Pearson talking about Durrington Walls, a site just up the river. He's got the idea that Stonehenge was a place of the dead, while Durrington was a place to live. I've got friends who worked on that dig and, uh, consider some of his evidence a bit stretched, but it's as good a theory as any of them. Essentially, every academic prehistorian has their own pet theory and tends to ignore the others.
Yes, that's right, that was probably him.

Andno, I don't believe in sacrifices there - but who knows ? It's been too long ago …

Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction. (E.F.Schumacher, Economist, Source)
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September 5th, 2013, 03:40
I don't think there was any sacrifice there. The celts didn't build it and that seems to be where that logic comes from.

Also there is script going back at least to 10k BC in central europe but we don't know for sure it's a language like we know it.

Most of what alrik posted, I agree with, too. Most of it is pretty certain. Plus the romans themselves and a lot of others have direct genetic evidence of coming out of anatolia. The etruscans probably came out before the romans, though, and not in the fall of troy. Only reason anyone doubted that in the past is sometime in the last 500 years we started to think that troy was a legend but now we know where it is again. The romans knew and even returned and built a city there for a while, that also got razed and forgotten. Not the luckiest spot in the world.

Basically illiad should be taken like a history of the end of troy and mycenaens, not a fiction. Of course it's probably more like braveheart the movie kind of history, not meant to be taken as 100% reliable.
Last edited by ManWhoJaped; September 5th, 2013 at 03:57.
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