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RPGWatch Forums » General Forums » Off-Topic » After Naked picture scandal, apple now wants you to get into the Celebs hotell rooms

Default After Naked picture scandal, apple now wants you to get into the Celebs hotel rooms

September 10th, 2014, 10:23
So it is not enough to allow the internet to see everyones private pictures on iCloud, the next step for apple appears to be to let you into their hotel rooms!

Link: http://bostonherald.com/business/tec…st_apple_watch

Quote:

Starwood Hotels, that will incorporate hotel key cards as an app to open doors;
Last edited by GothicGothicness; September 10th, 2014 at 12:05.
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September 10th, 2014, 11:51
The ting that amazes me the most is that people actually trust these corporations still with anything personal.

The iPhone 6 will have a Google Wallet clone. Who in their right mind and with the intelligence required to pass kindergarten would be stupid enough to put a credit card number (or worse, debit card linked to a bank account) on their phone?

Or uploading pictures you want to keep private to the internet? I know it was a cloud scam, but still, you have to be dense to not realize that nothing remains private online.

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September 10th, 2014, 18:09
Originally Posted by azraelck View Post
Or uploading pictures you want to keep private to the internet? I know it was a cloud scam, but still, you have to be dense to not realize that nothing remains private online.
I guess it's just forgetfulness. Who remembers 4 months later that he clicked on something that said you would backup all pics you take on the phone to the cloud.
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September 10th, 2014, 18:25
Originally Posted by Turjan View Post
I guess it's just forgetfulness. Who remembers 4 months later that he clicked on something that said you would backup all pics you take on the phone to the cloud.
Not that I would ever use an apple device, except an ipod I got for free, but I think the iCloud upload is automatic by default ( if you've signed in and all ), no need to click on anything even.
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September 10th, 2014, 18:35
I see. I have a Sony phone, and both Google and Sony asked me whether I wanted to have all my photos backed up online with unlimited storage space, so that's why I mentioned that.
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September 10th, 2014, 21:45
Only use the cloud services where everything is locally encrypted such as Spideroak and Mega. Ignore all the others.

Mega offers 50 GB of space for free with apps and a sync client, it's an especially good deal.
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September 10th, 2014, 22:23
Yep, my company uses the iphone and I accidentally snapped a shot of me and family members sunbathing
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September 11th, 2014, 10:27
Originally Posted by GothicGothicness View Post
Not that I would ever use an apple device, except an ipod I got for free, but I think the iCloud upload is automatic by default ( if you've signed in and all ), no need to click on anything even.
There is a basic issue here about spouting off about stuff when you have NO FUCKING CLUE about any of it, since you are wrong on every single count. Ugh.

So you also believe we shouldn't use online purchases of any type? Right? I mean, you must based on your reasoning?

And if you were a victim of identity theft because someone got your credit card number, you would naturally blame … um, the credit card company who brought the fraudulent purchases to your attention? Again, same logic.

Also, apparently you have never heard about NFC or Bluetooth control … because some hotels ALREADY have tie-ins with smartphone apps using NFC or Bluetooth to unlock doors, going all the way back to 2011. Mostly it is not through a smartphone, but through a non-swipe card system … and even the most basic of research would have shown you this.

Look - I get it, you have an irrational hate for Apple, whatever … so you want to blame them for things regardless of whether it was their fault. Have fun with that. But the question you should ask yourself is "do I hate them enough that I would like to demonstrate my fundamental lack of knowledge about technology to insult them?" Because right now the answer is 'yes'.

Criminals used relatively low-tech schemes to guess user names and passwords to violate the privacy of people - these people happened to be celebrities, and some of these celebrities happened to have pictures of themselves with no clothes on.

Had the criminals released a bunch of my running selfies, no one would have cared, and the blame would have been on the people who actually violated privacy ….

… but because it was celebrities and 'nudies' … people are getting stupid and braindead and engaging in 'victim blaming', shaming, and of course blaming Apple because that is what mindless anti-Apple minions do all the time. Yay.

And just to be VERY clear, no … Apple does NOT automatically upload your photos. In fact, activating my new Samsung Galaxy Note 3 did more automatic stuff without asking me than when I activated my iPad. It just assumes you want to install everything you had before with whatever settings you had in place, so you have to go into dozens of apps and change things.

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September 11th, 2014, 10:56
I know you are an apple fan, but I think you are acctually displaying your lack of knowledge here.

First of all, it should not be possible to use brute force to hack a iCloud solution, if you fail to login a certain amount of times or login from a new device, there should be some kind of enhanced security, in other words apples solution is not secure enough, dropbox, google etc, has realised it long ago and uses more secure solutions with several phases.

Also, for example on window machines, if you install iCloud control panel, it'll turn on my photo stream automatically, this is a quote from apples website:

On a Windows computer

Install the iCloud Control Panel if it isn’t already installed on your computer.

Open the iCloud Control Panel, then turn on Photos.

My Photo Stream is set up by default. To turn it off, click Options, then turn off My Photo Stream.
There is other cases when user will backup their things without realizing it means that it is availabile to the public on the iphone by using some simple brute force hacking + many iphones comes with preconfigured backup to iCloud.

In other words, I doubt that apples solution would be secure enough to let you open hotel rooms, yes there are already cases today where the solutions you are talking about has gone wrong and people have been able to open the wrong hotel room, but the apple watch if it becomes popular would probably greatly increase those cases.

Come back to this thread once the first reports of that happening is out, no need for us to discuss more about that until it happend? right?
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September 11th, 2014, 11:21
People defending apple on an RPG web site? lol. Just can't wait to get an rfid owned cattle chip in the arm, eh? I am sure they are pushing for this above anything else, and won't make any non-rfid version secure. It's already crazy they can track exact location of your phone, now there's no need for the phone even.

For something like this there should be key built into the phone itself to decrypt everything stored in the cloud. It's hilarious to me to think that anyone on earth is able to simply guys the password of Jennifer Lawrence or whoever and get their stuff.

I just don't get how companies get away scot free when they provide services that basically are completely insecure and that they make no effort to secure. Microsoft should have been sued for billions by now, and Apple shut down.
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September 11th, 2014, 13:18
Originally Posted by GothicGothicness View Post
I know you are an apple fan, but I think you are acctually displaying your lack of knowledge here.
Seriously? Let's see, two things:
- I am a TECHNOLOGY fan, and own products from Apple as well as Samsung (phone and Chromebook), Amazon (tablet), Sony (backup laptop), HP (work and 'home work' laptop), Alienware (gaming), ASUS (tablet) … and so on. Aside from an iPhone 5, my smartphones have ALWAYS been Android (well, Blackberry and Microsoft before that).
- I corrected you on an incorrect statement, you fail to acknowledge that and claim that *I* am lacking knowledge. Um, yeah.
Originally Posted by GothicGothicness View Post
First of all, it should not be possible to use brute force to hack a iCloud solution, if you fail to login a certain amount of times or login from a new device, there should be some kind of enhanced security, in other words apples solution is not secure enough, dropbox, google etc, has realised it long ago and uses more secure solutions with several phases.
It is called 'two factor authentication' … and Apple offers it and has for a while - but the celebrities in question chose NOT to use it! That said - Apple was (as usual) slow to implement it … but then, their dismal record with Cloud-based stuff doesn't really need further illumination (MobileMe, anyone?)

But PLEASE do not pretend that this is JUST APPLE … I mean, unless you have two factor authentication, it is simple to gain access to someone's account. And because places like Google and Facebook offer 'authentication services', once you have logged into Gmail, you can get into literally hundreds of places. Easily - JUST as easily as with what happened.

Also, you might have heard that MILLIONS of Gmail accounts were compromised - email addresses and passwords for literally millions of accounts were just published.

So again - PLEASE stop … you really have no clue, and pretty much EVERY statement you have made is either incorrect or a half-truth at best.

Personally I like the way Steam does two-factor … they are a pain in the butt, as on my newest laptop between web browsers, locations, and the steam client I have probably had to re-verify 6 or more times in just a few months. Pain? Sure … but secure. And my Steam got hacked back in 2005, so I appreciate it.

Here is the reality - people want convenience, not hassles. They are willing to be insecure in order to gain convenience.

Originally Posted by GothicGothicness View Post
many iphones comes with preconfigured backup to iCloud.
No - this is absolutely incorrect. Ugh!

Apple is VERY specific - before your photos are uploaded YOU have to turn it on. If you go to a carrier shop and have THEM configure it for you and turn on auto-upload … that is NOT APPLE'S PROBLEM!

As opposed to Google - where you get about 6 pop-ups that come up when you first try to take a picture, one of which is about auto-upload … so the likelihood of accidentally turning it on is MUCH higher. Sorry - that is just reality.

Originally Posted by GothicGothicness View Post
In other words, I doubt that apples solution would be secure enough to let you open hotel rooms, yes there are already cases today where the solutions you are talking about has gone wrong and people have been able to open the wrong hotel room, but the apple watch if it becomes popular would probably greatly increase those cases.
Actually that is just delusional paranoia and anti-Apple sentiment clouding your judgment … because RIGHT NOW there are plenty of issues. Right now the sat majority of hotels use magnetic strip cards, and there are loads of documented hacks and cases (http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygree…oom-break-ins/) of how insecure these things are …

As opposed to the chip & pin and authentication system used by Apple (and standard with many payment systems outside of the US). Much more secure than the current system. Flawless? No … because NOTHING is totally secure.

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September 11th, 2014, 13:59
Originally Posted by txa1265 View Post
Seriously? Let's see, two things:
- I am a TECHNOLOGY fan, and own products from Apple as well as Samsung (phone and Chromebook), Amazon (tablet), Sony (backup laptop), HP (work and 'home work' laptop), Alienware (gaming), ASUS (tablet) … and so on. Aside from an iPhone 5, my smartphones have ALWAYS been Android (well, Blackberry and Microsoft before that).
- I corrected you on an incorrect statement, you fail to acknowledge that and claim that *I* am lacking knowledge. Um, yeah.


It is called 'two factor authentication' … and Apple offers it and has for a while - but the celebrities in question chose NOT to use it! That said - Apple was (as usual) slow to implement it … but then, their dismal record with Cloud-based stuff doesn't really need further illumination (MobileMe, anyone?)

But PLEASE do not pretend that this is JUST APPLE … I mean, unless you have two factor authentication, it is simple to gain access to someone's account. And because places like Google and Facebook offer 'authentication services', once you have logged into Gmail, you can get into literally hundreds of places. Easily - JUST as easily as with what happened.

Also, you might have heard that MILLIONS of Gmail accounts were compromised - email addresses and passwords for literally millions of accounts were just published.

So again - PLEASE stop … you really have no clue, and pretty much EVERY statement you have made is either incorrect or a half-truth at best.

Personally I like the way Steam does two-factor … they are a pain in the butt, as on my newest laptop between web browsers, locations, and the steam client I have probably had to re-verify 6 or more times in just a few months. Pain? Sure … but secure. And my Steam got hacked back in 2005, so I appreciate it.

Here is the reality - people want convenience, not hassles. They are willing to be insecure in order to gain convenience.



No - this is absolutely incorrect. Ugh!

Apple is VERY specific - before your photos are uploaded YOU have to turn it on. If you go to a carrier shop and have THEM configure it for you and turn on auto-upload … that is NOT APPLE'S PROBLEM!

As opposed to Google - where you get about 6 pop-ups that come up when you first try to take a picture, one of which is about auto-upload … so the likelihood of accidentally turning it on is MUCH higher. Sorry - that is just reality.



Actually that is just delusional paranoia and anti-Apple sentiment clouding your judgment … because RIGHT NOW there are plenty of issues. Right now the sat majority of hotels use magnetic strip cards, and there are loads of documented hacks and cases (http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygree…oom-break-ins/) of how insecure these things are …

As opposed to the chip & pin and authentication system used by Apple (and standard with many payment systems outside of the US). Much more secure than the current system. Flawless? No … because NOTHING is totally secure.
Well, as far as I can see from your post you agree that there are security flaw and apple are bad in the cloud department? If apple had done like for example google and force higher security upon the user ( which is what they should have done ) it'd have been much better, in the worst case they could have had an option to turn it off with a huge warning message. Besides it appears like the leak might have happend before they even implemented it, as they were too slow.

I gave you an example from the windows iCloud installation, however you do have a point that it is not apple's fault if the vendor pre-configure your backups on the iphone's, however it appears to me that it is far from obvious for most iPhone users that these backups happen and in what way they happen, I have been forced to use an iphone on occasion and I sure didn't know it was turned on, it should be made more obvious, and we could go more deeply into this, for example it appears like pictures that were deleted also could be retrieved among other things, I am not sure if you've read the details of the hack?

On the account of opening the doors, I never claimed that the current solutions are good or secure, the only thing I wrote is that I think that it is a potential flaw with having such a system in the apple watch, and I am fairly sure we'll see those headlines. Actually iWallet sounds kind of dangerous too.

I do not think google is perfect either, but in terms of security I trust them a lot more than apple, besdies by blaiming them for the leak of 5 millions gmail passwords you are really giving a bad example, as it is clearly stated that the leak was not from google, if people use their same credentials on other sites, how can google be blaimed for that security not being good ?
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September 11th, 2014, 14:43
Lets get the real root of the problem which is:

Pretty women like to get their picture taken scantily dressed in provocative poses. Shocking, I know! But its true. Why? I have no idea, but every single woman I have dated had no problem with taking pictures of them. I may just date the wrong types of women, who knows …
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September 11th, 2014, 14:45
Originally Posted by Toff View Post
Lets get the real root of the problem which is:

Pretty women like to get their picture taken scantily dressed in provocative poses. Shocking, I know! But its true. Why? I have no idea, but every single woman I have dated had no problem with taking pictures of them. I may just date the wrong types of women, who knows …
Porn. It has "normalized" lot of things.
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September 11th, 2014, 16:29
Originally Posted by GothicGothicness View Post
Well, as far as I can see from your post you agree that there are security flaw and apple are bad in the cloud department? If apple had done like for example google and force higher security upon the user ( which is what they should have done ) it'd have been much better, in the worst case they could have had an option to turn it off with a huge warning message. Besides it appears like the leak might have happend before they even implemented it, as they were too slow.
A few things:
- It isn't a 'security flaw' as much as targeted attacks that demonstrate vulnerabilities - someone deliberately targeted celebrities, found their email address, obtained basic personal information online, and used a password retrieval tool to get into their accounts. People in the weeks since have shown how easy this is to do ON EVERY ONLINE SYSTEM!
- Google does NOT force this increased security … I have no clue why you have this dogged insistence about Google. Basically - they are not necessarily more secure.

More specifically … once you have managed to gain access to an email account …
- Yahoo - you have all Flickr files
- Microsoft - entire SkyDrive is yours
- Facebook - Instagram, etc are yours
- Google - everything is one-click away
- Apple - same …

As you note, it really becomes a different type of issue when people use the 'login with Google' or 'login with Facebook' and link up accounts … but the reality is that for most people, they can hit up dozens of sites with their personal info stored authenticated by Google or Facebook, meaning that if snooped over a public WiFi area it is possible to grab the login details.

That is actually one potential way for the celebs to have been attacked - at the Emmy awards, they had access to WiFi, and supposedly this could have been where the account details were snooped. This isn't an Apple thing, but rather a general internet issue.

Originally Posted by GothicGothicness View Post
I do not think google is perfect either, but in terms of security I trust them a lot more than apple, besdies by blaiming them for the leak of 5 millions gmail passwords you are really giving a bad example, as it is clearly stated that the leak was not from google, if people use their same credentials on other sites, how can google be blaimed for that security not being good ?
My point is that the ability to obtain millions of GMail addresses, and then turn around and from any computer or phone (unless you have two-factor enabled) simply login and access everything … is really no different than what we are seeing with the celebs.

Assuming WiFi was used, basically someone grabbed credentials and used them to login. This is how much of the list put up on the Russian bitcoin site was generated, also through hacks and phishing … but regardless, if the user in question hasn't taken additional steps, the outcome is identical.

As for Google, they are a great company, and I think they are amongst the best in terms of security … but there are different reasons they shouldn't be trusted. Apple makes money selling THINGS. Google makes money by selling … your private data, the contents of your emails, your search history, by compromising browser security to track your activity, and so on. Google 'sells' some things, but they make a few % on it … it is by monetizing search and app activity through targeted ads, made better because they have SO MUCH information about you.

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September 11th, 2014, 16:44
Originally Posted by txa1265 View Post
A few things:
- It isn't a 'security flaw' as much as targeted attacks that demonstrate vulnerabilities - someone deliberately targeted celebrities, found their email address, obtained basic personal information online, and used a password retrieval tool to get into their accounts. People in the weeks since have shown how easy this is to do ON EVERY ONLINE SYSTEM!
- Google does NOT force this increased security … I have no clue why you have this dogged insistence about Google. Basically - they are not necessarily more secure.

More specifically … once you have managed to gain access to an email account …
- Yahoo - you have all Flickr files
- Microsoft - entire SkyDrive is yours
- Facebook - Instagram, etc are yours
- Google - everything is one-click away
- Apple - same …

As you note, it really becomes a different type of issue when people use the 'login with Google' or 'login with Facebook' and link up accounts … but the reality is that for most people, they can hit up dozens of sites with their personal info stored authenticated by Google or Facebook, meaning that if snooped over a public WiFi area it is possible to grab the login details.

That is actually one potential way for the celebs to have been attacked - at the Emmy awards, they had access to WiFi, and supposedly this could have been where the account details were snooped. This isn't an Apple thing, but rather a general internet issue.



My point is that the ability to obtain millions of GMail addresses, and then turn around and from any computer or phone (unless you have two-factor enabled) simply login and access everything … is really no different than what we are seeing with the celebs.

Assuming WiFi was used, basically someone grabbed credentials and used them to login. This is how much of the list put up on the Russian bitcoin site was generated, also through hacks and phishing … but regardless, if the user in question hasn't taken additional steps, the outcome is identical.

As for Google, they are a great company, and I think they are amongst the best in terms of security … but there are different reasons they shouldn't be trusted. Apple makes money selling THINGS. Google makes money by selling … your private data, the contents of your emails, your search history, by compromising browser security to track your activity, and so on. Google 'sells' some things, but they make a few % on it … it is by monetizing search and app activity through targeted ads, made better because they have SO MUCH information about you.
Well, at least on my gmail ( and yes I was acctually annoyed by it ), without asking me, when I logged in for a new location it required the two-phase authentication from me. Maybe they enabled it on a country basis or some such, I do not know, but from that I am speaking of my experience and others as well, if they did not do it in the US for example, then they are of course in the same position as apple there.

Regarding public wifi, you should never use it of course, but in the Oscar's I think they'd have some measures of security and encryption around the wifi, at least I should hope it was professionally handled, on top of that it is not easy to get SSL encrypted data, what you can do if you have control over the wifi routing is to route the victim to a fake gmail site and steal the password that way. But if you have control over the DNS controller or router or such, no measure of security will prevent the stealing. This case I think even apple confirmed that they used brute force, unless they took that back. That is what I found unacceptable, yes google were also hacked long ago and after that they enhanced their security, apple should have done the same at that time already, given how much of our private stuff it stores.

Regarding google, I completely agree with you about that the way they use the information is pretty horrible, just the other day I booked a hotel, and no matter which site I visited ( they almost all have google ads ) it'd place advertisments of this hotel on the webiste. No need to even be logged in to my google account when visiting the site.

It is even worse if you have a shared computer with a smart friend or partner it'll reveal your secrets such as suprise parties or birthday gifts to them. Of course you have the option to use in private surfing which helps against that.
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September 11th, 2014, 17:25
Originally Posted by GothicGothicness View Post
apple should have done the same at that time already, given how much of our private stuff it stores.
Absolutely totally agree And I hope that this event - even though it wasn't a 'hack' or 'breach', is a wake-up call, as it seems to be.

Seems the US doesn't allow companies to force 2-level authentication.

Originally Posted by GothicGothicness View Post
Regarding google, I completely agree with you about that the way they use the information is pretty horrible, just the other day I booked a hotel, and no matter which site I visited ( they almost all have google ads ) it'd place advertisments of this hotel on the webiste. No need to even be logged in to my google account when visiting the site.
That is the scary thing … that you can be on one computer, not logged into Google sites (my company blocks webmail and any of those logins) … and yet they know it is you …

I had a similar thing - looking at a piece of measurement equipment on my work computer (which uses IE 8), and suddenly on a web forum on my iPad I started seeing ads for that exact company …

Originally Posted by GothicGothicness View Post
It is even worse if you have a shared computer with a smart friend or partner it'll reveal your secrets such as suprise parties or birthday gifts to them. Of course you have the option to use in private surfing which helps against that.
haha - I do use different browsers on my iPad to help with that … but we share one Amazon account to maximize the benefit of our Prime membership, so it means we have to ignore all of the 'because you recently viewed' stuff

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September 11th, 2014, 19:19
Originally Posted by txa1265 View Post
That is the scary thing … that you can be on one computer, not logged into Google sites (my company blocks webmail and any of those logins) … and yet they know it is you …
This is one of the consequences of their data collection that I really don't like. Tailored results limit what you see on Google. I have the feeling that, over the last 2 years, the breadth of results I get in Google searches has narrowed down considerably. They basically always show me similar things; which is often enough not what I want.
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September 11th, 2014, 19:27
Originally Posted by Turjan View Post
This is one of the consequences of their data collection that I really don't like. Tailored results limit what you see on Google. I have the feeling that, over the last 2 years, the breadth of results I get in Google searches has narrowed down considerably. They basically always show me similar things; which is often enough not what I want.
Yes indeed … and I know this is getting off-topic, but all you have to do is spend a week trying to make Bing your search engine and you'll be back with Google! haha And yes, I tried.

Same for GMail - remains my go-to email account. And even with my iOS devices I have my pictures uploaded to Google Images. My kids are totally into Drive for all of their school assignments … and on and on.

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September 11th, 2014, 21:14
Originally Posted by txa1265 View Post
Yes indeed … and I know this is getting off-topic, but all you have to do is spend a week trying to make Bing your search engine and you'll be back with Google! haha And yes, I tried.
So it's not just my imagination? Some time ago, I was looking at some maps in an area on the US west coast, basically for some real world Simcity 4 map I was using, to get place names etc. I first tried Google, but the maps were very low quality with misplaced labels, so not very useful. Then I discovered that Bing maps were much better, so I always switched to Bing maps when looking up stuff in that area. I think it took two weeks, then I discovered that the Google maps were updated. Absolutely gorgeous. I first thought it was simple coincidence, but only the maps in the area I looked at were updated, everything around it looked the same as before. I still have my doubts they would do this because only one person went for a search, but it was weird. Maybe that SC4 map was popular.

Edit: Just want to add that I didn't want to imply they took new pics just for me (I'm not that crazy), but they may have prioritized some planned update.
Last edited by Turjan; September 12th, 2014 at 07:44.
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