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Divinity II: FoV - Review @ GameShard

by Dhruin, 2011-01-19 22:21:49

GameShard has a review of the Divinity II expansion, Flames of Vengeance. This is one of the few articles that focuses purely on the expansion and the result is a mixed 7/10.  Their main complaint is the lack of hand-holding and the limited use of the dragon form - both possibly positives for some readers:

That said, combat doesn't actually play as large a role in Flame of Vengeance as it did in Ego Draconis. The majority of quests require investigative or conversational skills; all about talking to the right people or working out the (sometimes fiendish) puzzles. This would be a lot easier, though, if the quest tracking system wasn't almost completely useless. Quest descriptions are all too often vague, with unhelpful objective markers, and whilst there's a lot to be said for working things out for yourself you do need something to go on. One of the main quests has you looking for five clues, but refuses to give you any idea where to look or even what to look for. Your quest log rather unhelpfully notes that "I need five clues to continue, but I don't know where they are, so I guess I better just look around." Brilliant, thanks for that.

The most crushing aspect of Flames of Vengeance, though, are the almost complete omission of two of Divinity II's most interesting mechanics. Firstly, the Battle Tower, which returns from the first game, is now all-but rendered useless. Yes, you can still visit the trainers and enchanters and storage boxes there, but you'll rarely have any cause to, since all of the above can be done within the confines of the city anyway, and with no new content around the Battle Tower its presences feels superficial at best. The lockdown of your ability to transform into a dragon is less forgivable, though: you're confined to the city because its under aerial siege, which is just about plausible as plot-related restrictions go, but there are no areas in the game - at all - where you can hop into dragon form for a bit of a fly around. Surely we could have had a cavernous dungeon somewhere under the city? Admittedly, the one time you do get to use your dragon form (no transformation, though, you're just teleported to the area and appear in dragon form in the sky) is absolutely fantastic; a dramatic assault on the airborne besiegers spearheaded by a large ship that you have to protect is both challenging, thrilling, and hugely cinematic - though the finale which follows isn't quite so dramatic.

Information about

Divinity II: FoV

SP/MP: Single-player
Setting: Fantasy
Genre: RPG
Platform: PC, Xbox 360
Release: Released


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