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November 12th, 2019, 11:38
Originally Posted by vurt View Post
No, it worked great in KOTOR for example, you don't need to use existing characters, you can use them vaguely, in the background basically. I've seen it for the Conan universe and some other games too, works quite well.
KOTOR might well be a fun game for Star Wars fans but it's barely adequate as an RPG and if you're not into Star Wars it's incredibly boring, mechanics, exploration and combat-wise. If you're just into experiencing a universe and are not that interested in anything beyond that then there's not much point demanding it be an RPG, you can have Star Wars games in practically any genre.

I notice you say Conan games rather than Conan RPGs, because, again, the fixed protagonist issue, amongst other things, most importantly of which is if you're not playing Conan is it a Conan game and if you're just in the Conan universe is there really enough Conan material around to make enough variety for a full RPG as opposed to a game that includes some elements of Conan and just reems of made-up stuff anyway..

Originally Posted by vurt View Post
Uh no.. and why would you think enemy variety would be affected?
Well, duh, if you have an Alien franchise RPG you're limited to what creatures exist in the Alien franchise, LOL.

Originally Posted by vurt View Post
Quote where i've said i have problems with getting to grips with different mechanics?
Well, you said "I often find myself quite alienated by RPG's because the formula is new and totally unexplored." and formula can mean either mechanics or structure, but it very rarely means setting, hence the confusion I guess.

Originally Posted by vurt View Post
Environments and characters is a real hit and miss in RPG's. Like i said, there are times where they can make something really original stuff work, that's amazing when it happens. Arcanum would be a good example, it's quite original yet it works quite brilliantly, it's tastefully done and doesn't alienate me, i "get" this universe almost instantly.

RPG's are traditionally very generic, themes borrowed from LOTR and other very familiar fantasy, those types of games i have no problem getting into.
Saying RPGs are generic and borrow lots of stuff from LOTR just shows how unknowledgeable you are about the subject. As Couch said, there's barely ever been a LOTR RPG, and when there was it wasn't a big hit and barely anyone even remembers it. Nobody kills any rats in LOTR, there aren't hoards of skeletons to kill, no vampires, no minotaurs, no mindflayers, no beholders, no ettins, no huge sprawling dungeon mazes, no ettercaps, no dinosaurs, no paladins, no lock picking, I could go on and on.

The element of LOTR that is common is only really the predominance of the humanoid types of Dwarf, Elf, Orcs and Goblins, which I will admit is mostly because people who cash-in on LOTR want to advertise to the same demographic, but beyond those specific archetypes there's very little to compare to LOTR and I'm not sure anyone would compare Divinty Original Sin to LOTR just because it has Goblins in it. That would be like saying Icewind Dale is like Night of the Living Dead because it has zombies in it.

So if it's just setting that you're talking about and not specific elements within the environments then, no, barely any games let alone RPGs resemble LOTR. LOTR itself was something that took existing mythology and worked it into a new setting/universe, so it's incredibly misleading to then ascribe all the ancient lore that LOTR stole/adapted to only LOTR and then declare anything which has those ancient bits of lore as LOTR instead of where it was they originally came from, which is a hotchpotch of many mythologies. That would be like saying you were bored of cities because they all have buildings.

Originally Posted by vurt View Post
There are quite a few exceptions though especially jRPG's which can be very alienating and there seems to be a bit of a drift to doing more original stuff in the genre overall, that i do not like because it tend to like the generic more than "look at our super original universe we spent a whole month on creating!" it's usually shit.
You say something is 'usually' shit but then fail to say which ones you've played in order to qualify this statement. 'Usually' implies multiple examples of something, and yet you provide… zero examples.
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November 12th, 2019, 12:07
If you knew anything about Alien universe you should know it has way more species than the Xenomorphs.. in fact the main enemy in this universe you might say are other humans. Apart from humans there's the Predator species, droids, Engineers, River Ghosts, Facehuggers, Alien Queens, Alien Dog ("runner" i believe they call them?) + probably tons of others. Since i collect the various Predators and Aliens figures i know the variety is very big.. i have a whole section of various Predators (shamans etc)..

Any RPG universe is limited though, at least it should be. It would not make sense or be tasteful to just add in everything because "you can". It's something you can expect in shitty jRPGs and other absolutely tasteless RPG's where they just put in whatever with no idea of how to make an immersive and tastefully done universe. And no, i don't remember any of the names of these RPG's, i dont buy or play them.
edit: i guess i can mention Final Fantasy. I remember playing one of them and one of the first enemy mobs i encountered were giant birds (ostrich-like) they wore top hats and i believe their weapon were lasers. just no… Outer Worlds is another one that is insta-skip for me, even though i love sci-fi. i really hate how the environment and art looks in this game, it's not the least tasteful. it's like they've mixed bioshock with generic sci-fi yet with their own take of color scheme (which is horrible). It's terrible and it alienates me.

LOTR has historically been the biggest influence overall for RPG's, many borrowing both story elements, environments and various characters and species. The resemblance is hard to ignore, and if you do you're pretty clueless about RPG's in general i would say. And very true, there has not been a good LOTR game (as in game that is actually using LOTR IP). There has been many games borrowing elements from it though that has been good, like TES.

But whatever man, you enjoy what you enjoy. Not saying anyone shouldnt enjoy Final Fantasy or whatever, its just not for me.
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Last edited by vurt; November 12th, 2019 at 12:17.
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November 12th, 2019, 12:11
My Alien RPG wouldn't be focused on combat with aliens. It would be mostly focused on exploration and journal/log-based delivery of narrative.

Think Alien Isolation + System Shock 2 + Deus Ex and you'd have some idea.

Most combat would probably be against humanoids or security bots, etc.

I don't think the Alien creature is well served by going overboard. I'd rather have infrequent encounters - and build tension around the expectation.

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November 12th, 2019, 12:14
Originally Posted by vurt View Post
LOTR has historically been the biggest influence overall for RPG's, many borrowing both story elements, environments and various characters and species. The resemblance is hard to ignore, and if you do you're pretty clueless about RPG's in general i would say.
No, Dungeons and Dragons has historically been the biggest influence overall for RPGs. Again, your words are mostly expressions of the definite without any examples for reference. AKA, hyperbole. Agenda-driven hyperbole.
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November 12th, 2019, 12:21
Originally Posted by lackblogger View Post
Well, duh, if you have an Alien franchise RPG you're limited to what creatures exist in the Alien franchise, LOL.
First off, you are not limited to that at all. There's nothing in the Alien lore that limits you to what you have already seen.

That said, the existing variety is actually quite large.
You have all kinds of different xenomorphs (that is a quite long list of very different forms and shape, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o…lien_franchise).
There's humans and androids.
There's mechanical constructs / robots.
You might have Predators (if you include that crossover).
And alot of hybrids.

Certainly not worse than, e.g., Outer Worlds.

Regardless, I agree with DArt:
Originally Posted by BriefDArt View Post
My Alien RPG wouldn't be focused on combat with aliens. It would be mostly focused on exploration and journal/log-based delivery of narrative.

Think Alien Isolation + System Shock 2 + Deus Ex and you'd have some idea.

Most combat would probably be against humanoids or security bots, etc.

I don't think the Alien creature is well served by going overboard. I'd rather have infrequent encounters - and build tension around the expectation.
That sounds good.
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November 12th, 2019, 12:23
I think we can conclude that you probably need some imagination or a little insight - if you're going to succeed in using a setting to its advantage

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November 12th, 2019, 12:28
Originally Posted by lackblogger View Post
No, Dungeons and Dragons has historically been the biggest influence overall for RPGs. Again, your words are mostly expressions of the definite without any examples for reference. AKA, hyperbole. Agenda-driven hyperbole.
Let me google real quick.. first hit;

"The fantasy role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons is inevitably (and frequently) linked to J.R.R. Tolkien's trilogy The Lord of the Rings".

I'm sure D&D had other influences as well, and just because D&D has been a big influence for RPG's does not mean they could not also be very influenced by other works, such as LOTR. One does not nullify the other. I do remember reading that Bethesda were influenced by LOTR, i'm quite positive they are not alone in being inspired by the greatest, most well known Fantasy books known to man It goes against all logic really.
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November 12th, 2019, 12:31
vurt, you're wasting your time

We wouldn't have D&D without Tolkien. Certainly not in that time or form. Tolkien inspired 99% of everything fantasy related that came after LotR.

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November 12th, 2019, 12:35
In other words… make stuff up that wasn't in the franchise, which is what all RPGs do anyway. So what is the original franchise concept except as a cash-in name to bring people to your product?

An 'expanded universe' including cash-in literature, fan-fiction, crappy film sequels and comic books. So if Superman appears in an Alien comic book once then Superman can exist in the Alien universe?

Oh, whoa, it's basically turning into D&D where you already can have anything you want in the game, limited only by your imagination, and, oh yes, copywrite issues.

So what you're saying is that you just want a dark and moody space game with lots of green lighting and as long as a xenomorph encounter happens at least once then it's an Alien 'themed' RPG

Why not just make a moody sci-fi game with green lighting, robots and weird aliens and do you're own thing? Why do you need the lazy tie-in?
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November 12th, 2019, 12:38
@BriefDArt clearly lol
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November 12th, 2019, 12:41
Originally Posted by vurt View Post
Let me google real quick.. first hit;

"The fantasy role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons is inevitably (and frequently) linked to J.R.R. Tolkien's trilogy The Lord of the Rings".

I'm sure D&D had other influences as well, and just because D&D has been a big influence for RPG's does not mean they could not also be very influenced by other works, such as LOTR. One does not nullify the other. I do remember reading that Bethesda were influenced by LOTR, i'm quite positive they are not alone in being inspired by the greatest, most well known Fantasy books known to man It goes against all logic really.
Let me google just quickly:

LOTR was influenced by:

Christian influences[edit]
Tolkien once described The Lord of the Rings to his friend, the English Jesuit Father Robert Murray, as "a fundamentally religious and Catholic work, unconsciously so at first, but consciously in the revision."[1] Many theological themes underlie the narrative, including the battle of good versus evil, the triumph of humility over pride, and the activity of grace, as seen with Frodo's pity toward Gollum. In addition the epic includes the themes of death and immortality, mercy and pity, resurrection, salvation, repentance, self-sacrifice, free will, justice, fellowship, authority and healing. Tolkien mentions the Lord's Prayer, especially the line "And lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil" in connection with Frodo's struggles against the power of the One Ring.[2] Tolkien has also said "Of course God is in The Lord of the Rings. The period was pre-Christian, but it was a monotheistic world" and when questioned who was the One God of Middle-earth, Tolkien replied "The one, of course! The book is about the world that God created – the actual world of this planet."[3]
Norse influences[edit]
Tolkien was heavily influenced by Norse mythology. During his education at King Edward's School in Birmingham, the then young Tolkien read and translated from the Old Norse on his own time.[4] One of his first Norse purchases was the Völsunga saga. It is known that while a student, Tolkien read the only available English translation[5][6] of the Völsunga saga, that by William Morris of the Victorian Arts and Crafts Movement and Icelandic scholar Eiríkur Magnússon.[7] The Old Norse Völsunga saga and the Old High German Nibelungenlied were coeval texts made with the use of the same ancient sources.[8][9] Both of them provided some of the basis for Richard Wagner's opera series, Der Ring des Nibelungen, featuring in particular a magical golden ring and a broken sword reforged. In the Völsunga saga, these items are respectively Andvarinaut and Gram, and they correspond broadly to the One Ring and the sword Narsil (reforged as Andúril).[10] The Volsunga Saga also gives various names found in Tolkien. Tolkien wrote a book entitled The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún, in which he discusses the saga in relation to the myth of Sigurd and Gudrún.
The figure of Gandalf is particularly influenced by the Norse deity Odin[11] in his incarnation as "The Wanderer", an old man with one eye, a long white beard, a wide brimmed hat, and a staff. Tolkien, in a 1946 letter, nearly a decade after the character was invented, wrote that he thought of Gandalf as an "Odinic wanderer".[2] Much like Odin, Gandalf promotes justice, knowledge, truth, and insight.[12]
The Balrog and the collapse of the Bridge of Khazad-dûm in Moria, is a direct parallel of the fire jötunn Surtr and the foretold destruction of Asgard's bridge in Norse myth.[13]
Germanic influences[edit]
Tolkien's Elves and Dwarves are by and large based on the elves and dwarfs of Germanic mythology[14][15] Two sources that contain accounts of elves and dwarfs that were of interest to Tolkien were the Prose Edda and the Elder or Poetic Edda. The descriptions of elves and dwarves in these works are ambiguous and contradictory, however. Within the contents of the Völuspá, specifically in stanza 9, the creation of Dwarves predates Man, which is precisely the formula Tolkien uses for Middle-earth.[16] The names of Gandalf and the dwarves in The Hobbit were taken from the "Dvergatal" section of Völuspá in the Poetic Edda and the "Gylfaginning" section of the Prose Edda.[12]
Tolkien was a Professor of Old English/Anglo-Saxon and Middle English language and literature, and this literature, particularly Beowulf, influenced his own writings.[14] As Tolley tells us in his Old English Influences on The Lord of the Rings,[17] the ideas of heroism and masculinity that inform the character of Beowulf, can also be seen in Aragorn. Both Aragorn and Beowulf have questionable family lines,[citation needed] and both take on kingship only for the good of the people. Other themes, such as the conversation in The Hobbit between Bilbo Baggins and Smaug the dragon, as well as the antagonism created by the mere mention of gold and even the concept of riddles, are also reflected in Beowulf.[14] Tolkien also based the people of Rohan, the Rohirrim, on the historical Anglo-Saxons, giving them Anglo-Saxon names, customs, and poetry.[14][18] The Anglo-Saxon poem, "The Wanderer," is paraphrased by Aragorn as an example of Rohirric verse.
Another major influence on Tolkien is riddle poetry from Anglo-Saxon England. Some of the oldest surviving Old English manuscripts contain riddle poems, such as the Leiden Riddle in the Leiden MS. The contest between Bilbo and Gollum is a good example of this.
Other mythological and linguistic influences[edit]
Finnish mythology and more specifically the Finnish national epic Kalevala were also acknowledged by Tolkien as an influence on Middle-earth.[19] In a manner similar to The Lord of the Rings, the Kalevala centres around a magical item of great power, the Sampo, which bestows great fortune on its owner, but never makes clear its exact nature. Like the One Ring, the Sampo is fought over by forces of good and evil, and is ultimately lost to the world as it is destroyed towards the end of the story. In another parallel, the work's wizard character, Väinämöinen, is similar to Gandalf in his immortal origins and wise nature, and both works end with the wizard character departing on a ship to lands beyond the mortal world. Tolkien also based elements of his Elvish language Quenya on Finnish.[20][21]
The extent of Celtic influence is debatable. Tolkien wrote that he gave the Elvish language Sindarin "a linguistic character very like (though not identical with) British-Welsh … because it seems to fit the rather 'Celtic' type of legends and stories told of its speakers".[22] A number of the names of characters and places in The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings have been found to have Welsh origin.[23] In addition, the depiction of elves has been described as deriving from Celtic mythology.[24]
Though Tolkien denied the influence of Arthurian legends, several parallels have been drawn.[25][26][27][28] Gandalf has been compared with Merlin,[29] Frodo and Aragorn with Arthur[30] and Galadriel with the Lady of the Lake.[25]
Modern literary influences[edit]
Tolkien was also influenced by more modern literature. The Ent attack on Isengard was inspired by "Birnam Wood coming to Dunsinane" in Shakespeare's Macbeth.[31] Charles Dickens' The Pickwick Papers has likewise been shown to have reflections in Tolkien.[32]
One of the greatest influences on Tolkien was the Arts and Crafts polymath William Morris. Tolkien wished to imitate Morris's prose and poetry romances,[33] along with the general style and approach; he took elements such as the Dead Marshes in The Lord of the Rings[34] and Mirkwood in The Hobbit from Morris.[35] He was also influenced by the modern fantasy author George MacDonald, who wrote The Princess and the Goblin. Books by the Inkling author Owen Barfield are also known to have contributed to his world-view, particularly The Silver Trumpet (1925), History in English Words (1926) and Poetic Diction (1928). Edward Wyke-Smith's Marvellous Land of Snergs, with its "table-high" title characters, strongly influenced the incidents, themes, and depiction of Bilbo's race in The Hobbit.[36]
The character George Babbitt from Babbitt was another inspiration for hobbits.[37]
In his biography of Tolkien, Carpenter[38] notes that in the limited amount of time Tolkien could apply to the reading of fiction, he "preferred the lighter contemporary novels". The stories of John Buchan are listed as an example . Critics such as Hooker[39] have detailed the resonances between the two authors.
Another contemporary adventure novel, H. Rider Haggard's She, was acknowledged by Tolkien in an interview: "I suppose as a boy She interested me as much as anything—like the Greek shard of Amyntas [Amenartas], which was the kind of machine by which everything got moving."[40] A supposed facsimile of this potsherd appeared in Haggard's first edition, and the ancient inscription it bore, once translated, led the English characters to She's ancient kingdom. Critics have compared this device to the Testament of Isildur in The Lord of the Rings[41] and Tolkien's efforts to produce as an illustration a realistic page from the Book of Mazarbul.[42] Critics starting with Edwin Muir[43] have found resemblances between Haggard's romances and Tolkien's.[44][45][46][47]


Verne's Runic Cryptogram from Journey to the Center of the Earth
Tolkien scholar Mark T. Hooker has catalogued a series of parallels between The Hobbit and Jules Verne's Journey to the Center of the Earth. These include, among other things, a hidden runic message and a celestial alignment that direct the adventurers to the goals of their quests.[48]
Tolkien wrote of being impressed as a boy by Samuel Rutherford Crockett's historical fantasy novel The Black Douglas and of basing the battle with the wargs in The Fellowship of the Ring on a battle with werewolves in it.[49] Incidents in both The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings are similar in narrative and style to the novel,[50] and its overall style and imagery have been suggested as having had an influence on Tolkien, and Crockett's villain Gilles de Retz as inspiring Sauron.[51]
Tolkien wrote that stories about "Red Indians" were his favourites as a boy. Shippey mentions Tolkien's interest in the primeval forests and people of North America, and speculates that the romantic descriptions of characters in James Fenimore Cooper might have influenced his descriptions of Aragorn and Éomer.[52]
Though he read many of Edgar Rice Burroughs' books, he denied that the Barsoom novels influenced his giant spiders: "I did read many of Edgar Rice Burroughs' earlier works, but I developed a dislike for his Tarzan even greater than my distaste for spiders. Spiders I had met long before Burroughs began to write, and I do not think he is in any way responsible for Shelob. At any rate I retain no memory of the Siths or the Apts."[53]
Wagnerian influences[edit]
Some critics have suggested that The Lord of the Rings was directly and heavily derived from Richard Wagner's opera cycle, Der Ring des Nibelungen, whose plot also centres on a powerful ring.[54] Others have argued that any similarity is due to the common influence of the Volsunga saga and the Nibelungenlied on both authors.[55][56]
Tolkien sought to dismiss critics' direct comparisons to Wagner, telling his publisher, "Both rings were round, and there the resemblance ceases." According to Humphrey Carpenter's biography of Tolkien, the author claimed to hold Wagner's interpretation of the relevant Germanic myths in contempt, even as a young man before reaching university.[57]
Some researchers take an intermediate position: that both the authors used the same sources, but that Tolkien was influenced by Wagner's development of the mythology,[58][59] especially the "concept of the Ring as giving the owner mastery of the world that was Wagner's own contribution to the myth of the Ring".[60] Wagner probably developed this element by combining the ring with a magical wand mentioned in the Nibelungenlied that could give to its wearer the control "over the race of men".[61][62] In addition, the corrupting power of Tolkien's One Ring has a central role in Wagner's operas but was not present in the mythical sources.[63][64]
Some argue that Tolkien's denial of a Wagnerian influence was an over-reaction to the statements of Åke Ohlmarks, Tolkien's Swedish translator, who in the introduction to his much-criticized translation of The Lord of the Rings "mixed material from various legends, some which mention no ring and one which concerns a totally different ring".[65][66][67] Furthermore, critics believe that Tolkien was reacting against the links between Wagner's work and Nazism.[68][69]
Personal experience[edit]
Some locations and characters were inspired by Tolkien's childhood in Birmingham, where he first lived near Sarehole Mill, and later near Edgbaston Reservoir.[70] There are also hints of the Black Country, which is within easy reach of north west Edgbaston. This shows in such names as "Underhill", and the description of Saruman's industrialization of Isengard and The Shire is explicitly stated by Tolkien to have been based on the industrialization of England.[71] It has also been suggested that The Shire and its surroundings were influenced by the Iron Age and Roman mineral workings and remains which Tolkien saw in 1929 when working with archaeologists Tessa and Mortimer Wheeler at Lydney Park in the Forest of Dean;[72] or alternatively were based on the countryside around Stonyhurst College in Lancashire where he frequently stayed during the 1940s.[73]
Contemporary warfare[edit]
The Lord of the Rings was crucially influenced by Tolkien's experiences during World War I and his son's during World War II.[74]
After the publication of The Lord of the Rings these influences led to speculation that the One Ring was an allegory for the nuclear bomb.[75] Tolkien, however, repeatedly insisted that his works were not an allegory of any kind.[76] He states in the foreword to The Lord of the Rings that he disliked allegories and that the story was not one.[77] Instead he preferred what he termed "applicability", the freedom of the reader to interpret the work in the light of his or her own life and times.[77] Tolkien had already completed most of the book, including the ending in its entirety, before the first nuclear bombs were made known to the world at Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945. Bedeviled, a book by Lewis/Tolkien scholar Colin Duriez, discusses in more depth how the World Wars and concepts of evil and suffering influenced the writings of Tolkien and his literary group, the Inklings. An article by Manni and Bonechi addresses the influences of WWII on The Lord of the Rings.[78]
Because you seem to be adamant that the trail begins and ends with LOTR, when LOTR is just another item in the backpack.

LOTR might have been on the reading list when they first conceived D&D, but then so were a whole raft of other stuff:

Tolkien was an influence, but not the primary influence.

According to Gary Gygax's introduction to the first edition of D&D, the main inspirations were:
Edgar Rice Burrough's John Carter of Mars books
Robert E Howard's Conan stories
L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt's Compleat Enchanter series
Fritz Leiber's Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser books

All of these fall under the 'pulp fantasy' (or 'planetary romance') genre, and all of the series were first started long before Lord of the Rings was published.

There is certainly a Tolkien influence on D&D. Back in the original edition, written in those glorious, long-forgotten days before the RPG industry had ever heard of intellectual property laws, there are explicit references to hobbits, orcs, balrogs, ents and rangers. These would all be removed or renamed later on - 'hobbits' became 'halflings', for instance. However, this was more a case of the writers of D&D taking a grab-bag of ideas from Lord of the Rings and throwing them into the pot along with a thousand other ideas.

The basic concept behind D&D as a game has much more in common with, say, a Conan story - a brawl in a tavern, finding a clue to a lost treasure, raiding an ancient ruin, finding the treasure is guarded by some ancient monster, defeating it and riding off into the sunset with the gold and the girl, only to be alone again and flat broke by the start of the next adventure - than it does with Frodo's moral quest to renounce power and destroy the Ring.
You're saying you're bored of the city because it has buildings in it.
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November 12th, 2019, 12:43
Originally Posted by BriefDArt View Post
vurt, you're wasting your time

We wouldn't have D&D without Tolkien. Certainly not in that time or form. Tolkien inspired 99% of everything fantasy related that came after LotR.
Irony much. We would have D&D without Tolkien. Well, duh, of course it would be different. Slightly. Absolute lies about the 99%. Can't wait for your evidential links for your relentless hyperbole.
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November 12th, 2019, 12:47
Originally Posted by lackblogger View Post
In other words… make stuff up that wasn't in the franchise, which is what all RPGs do anyway. So what is the original franchise concept except as a cash-in name to bring people to your product?
Yes, I'd guess you'd focus on that.

Originally Posted by lackblogger View Post
So what you're saying is
Nope.

You're not making the slightest effort to have a dialog here.
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November 12th, 2019, 12:51
Originally Posted by Cacheperl View Post
You're not making the slightest effort to have a dialog here.
To be fair, that was never his objective.

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November 12th, 2019, 12:55
Originally Posted by Cacheperl View Post
Nope.

You're not making the slightest effort to have a dialog here.
I sure am. However, replying with just a 'nope' without elaboration is the definition of stopping a discussion. Nice touch to then claim it's me stopping the discussion.

So let's move on a bit from "wouldn't it be nice if" and get down to some nuts and bolts:

What is you're player character's motivation? Are you going to be essentially walking through a linear story which would be not much different to a book or movie which retreads all the existing already made stories? Oh shock, that guy is actually an android working for the capitalist?

Or are you going to be completely abstracted from the whole evil capitalist framework of the series and just be a wanderer 'looting' Xenomorphs for acid blood to make acid enhancements to your Alien stabbing weapon? Gradually uncovering the mystery of why your wife/husband/whatever was kidnapped by… whoever?

Or are you imagining a planet-hopping game like Mass Effect where every planet is different and has different xenomorphs on it?

If you say 'nope' then you must know what it is you imagine, right?
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November 12th, 2019, 12:56
Originally Posted by BriefDArt View Post
To be fair, that was never his objective.
To be fair, you're just insulting me now. I look forward to you're inevitable complaints about me harassing you..
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November 12th, 2019, 13:32
https://www.aliensrpg.com/ (1989)

https://alien-rpg.com/ (coming December 10th)

Also:

In December 2006, SEGA announced that Obsidian Entertainment would develop an Alien role-playing game. The only tidbits of information they released about the game was that it "will be developed for the next-generation systems and the PC" and "The role playing game will build upon the distinctive look and feel of the original films while utilizing next-generation technology to create an entirely different and unique Alien experience."

In February 2009 it was rumored that Obsidian Entertainment laid off more than 20 employees and that the Alien RPG project was canceled. No official word about the projects status has yet been issued by either Sega or Obsidian, but the rumor was confirmed a couple of days later by one of the employees that were laid off.
In June 2009 Obsidian confirmed they were no longer working on the project. Sega then released the following statement indicating that the game was officially cancelled:

At this point, SEGA has no plans to move forward with the Aliens RPG. The Aliens franchise offers us so much content to choose from that we feel it important to take a step back and carefully consider the type of game we want to release. We plan to continue working with the Aliens franchise and ask fans to be patient and stay tuned for more information about what SEGA has coming out for the Aliens series of games, starting with the upcoming Alien vs. Predator game. We are very excited about and focused on Alien vs. Predator, which promises gamers a fantastic single player game and an equally compelling multiplayer experience. We are confident that it provides all the excitement and fun that the Aliens and Predator fans are looking for!
https://www.giantbomb.com/aliens-rpg/3030-20473/

Wouldn't it be great. *rolls eyes* It's already a very old idea that has already had ample opportunity to exist. The only original thing about it would be that a game actually got made about it.

I find it fascinating that the idea of making a cRPG out of a tired old franchise that's run itself in circles countless times and now relies on a very small but dedicated fanbase to exist should be described in any way as presenting the consuming public with 'originality' and a 'breath of fresh air'.

At a time when people are claiming "Hollywood is creatively bankrupt" because it keeps remaking the same things, I find it fascinating that people are trying to promote the idea that re-presenting those tired old franchises would in some way be 'creatively original' for no other reason that no-one's made one yet. Hey, let's have a Laurel and Hardy RPG while we're at it, maybe a Jurassic Park one as well. Hell, let's convert every movie franchise ever into an RPG… just imagine the untapped exploit potential!
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November 12th, 2019, 13:45
I said "nope" to something that can very clearly be answered with "nope". But of course you are right. Until you find the time and bother to read other peoples posts, it is only fair to put words in their mouth. I withdraw my objection.

Other than that, DArt already made some very reasonable suggestions of what kind of Alien game would work well.
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November 12th, 2019, 13:48
So you personally have no imagination of what you want from an Alien RPG you just think it would be nice to have an Alien RPG because having things is nice and you quite like the Alien universe, but you haven't really thought about it much. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
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November 12th, 2019, 14:06
Apart from Aliens and a proper LOTR RPG (the best one is still probably LOTR Online, which i did play quite a bit back in the days), i'd really like a Mad Max RPG. We do have the Fallouts, but Mad Max is quite different since there's quite a big focus on the vehicles. There's Mad Max from Avalanche (which i've played for a bit) which everyone seems to like, but its not a proper RPG. We don't have a lot of RPG's where a big part of the focus is vehicles (combat and so forth), so it'd be pretty unique in that way.
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