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August 2nd, 2014, 03:02
Hey everyone.

I have a lot to say about this subject, since (I think) I have adult ADHD, but I'm just curious if anyone else on this forum has this condition. If so, how does it affect your gaming life? Or your life in general?

I have some stuff to say about it, so I will post some of my symptoms and how they affect me after a few people have chimed in.

Cheers,

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August 2nd, 2014, 03:35
I am cursed by that.

It doesn't only affect my gaming, it burdens my existence.

I've justed recently learned that my mind played tricks on me and that this trick was called by scientists ADHD…………..

I am not sure how it affects my gaming since I am not sure of the symptoms.

Maybe if you or anybody else can explain with examples, I could point out how.

Some of the symptoms I think that are related is that I cannot game for long.
I can do an hour maybe two.
Same with life. I start something, like cleaning my appartment, then I find a book, read a few pages and stop. Go on the web. Play a game for some time then I remember that I was cleaning. Etc. Cleaning can take weeks.

Recently, I played a game that managed to captivate me for around 5 straight hours. That is a record fhat I have not reached in years.

Anyways, I'll let people chime in too and add as best I can.
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August 2nd, 2014, 08:01
This is mostly about everyday life - and not so much about gaming:

I don't have it, but my ex-GF had it and was diagnosed near the end of our relationship.

We lived together for 2 years.

She wasn't into gaming, but I tried introducing her to a few games a couple of times. She would start out being interested, but couldn't maintain interest.

She did love games like Plants versus Zombies and Farmville - and would play them in a way I might call obsessive, but who am I to judge that, eh?

Anyway, in terms of everyday life - it definitely affected her in a big way, and I would often suggest to her if it might be ADHD - but she wouldn't accept that and dismissed the notion.

She had a very hard time just sitting down and relaxing, and her biggest problem was finishing non-physical tasks that she knew had to be finished - like with her school projects. To me, it seemed that the fact that something HAD to be finished put an enormous amount of pressure on her, and she did everything she could to distract herself from doing it, because the thought of it having to be done - and her having to sit down and do the work just made her crazy. Big problem was that this distraction resulted in even more pressure, because time was always running out for her.

This made her very hard to be around when she had an important project, because she was so stressed - and nothing I said or didn't say seemed to help her or make her happy. I tried not saying anything at all - and that made it worse, because then I wasn't supporting her enough when she just needed to vent about it.

Anyway, she just couldn't make herself sit down and finish the damned homework, so she distracted herself. She would clean the house constantly - or she would go shopping. Sometimes, she would shop 4-5 times per day, which was something I'd never seen before. Personally, I loathe shopping and will keep that down to a minimum.

Needless to say, we had a lot of conflicts in the house - as I'm the exact opposite of someone with ADHD. I prefer to relax - and most tasks are chores to be done with me. So, because I hate having chores - I just do them immediately with very high efficiency - and I would NEVER do them as a distraction. This I do so I can focus on whatever it is I WANT to do. I'm not necessarily a messy person - though I'm sure many would think so - but I was absolutely NOT as "clean" as she would have wanted me to be, and she would often complain I didn't help out with the cleaning enough. I tried my best to contribute - but I also made it clear that it would only work if we made specific agreements about it, as cleaning "just because" would never, ever, be something I wanted to do.

The ONE thing we could do together with great success was to watch movies - and have dinner afterwards. I couldn't quite figure that out - because that meant sitting down and relaxing - but eventually I "got it". It was her way of letting go of her thoughts and just passively engage them in something pleasant. She's the only girl I've been with who loved movies more than I did - and we, literally, saw at least one new movie or the occasional episode of a TV show every day. We went to the movies very often - and sometimes several times per week, which was also kinda nice, because I hardly ever went to the movies otherwise.

I would have thought playing games could work in a similar way for her, but apparently she couldn't enjoy them because of the strain or pressure she felt when being challenged. This was something she told me often, but I didn't understand until she was diagnosed. So, to her, the worst part was definitely the pressure of having to focus her thoughts and accomplishing a challenging task. It scared her a lot.

This makes the condition resemble OCD in a way, though I realise it's a separate condition. But OCD is an anxiety disorder - and I've been suffering from anxiety for many years in the past, and I've learned to control it with quite a bit of success. But the fear is the thing - and it seems to lie at the heart of almost every kind of mental suffering there is.
Last edited by DArtagnan; August 2nd, 2014 at 08:57.

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August 2nd, 2014, 15:55
Originally Posted by The Wanderer View Post
I am cursed by that.

It doesn't only affect my gaming, it burdens my existence.

I've justed recently learned that my mind played tricks on me and that this trick was called by scientists ADHD…………..

I am not sure how it affects my gaming since I am not sure of the symptoms.

Maybe if you or anybody else can explain with examples, I could point out how.

Some of the symptoms I think that are related is that I cannot game for long.
I can do an hour maybe two.
Same with life. I start something, like cleaning my appartment, then I find a book, read a few pages and stop. Go on the web. Play a game for some time then I remember that I was cleaning. Etc. Cleaning can take weeks.

Recently, I played a game that managed to captivate me for around 5 straight hours. That is a record fhat I have not reached in years.

Anyways, I'll let people chime in too and add as best I can.
I know exactly what you're saying here. I'm the same way in some regards. I have a hard time sitting still, relaxing or doing something that I know needs to be done. I can game for awhile, but I always have to take breaks to do something else, then come back to the game again and play for a bit more, rinse and repeat.

Originally Posted by DArtagnan View Post
This is mostly about everyday life - and not so much about gaming:

I don't have it, but my ex-GF had it and was diagnosed near the end of our relationship.

We lived together for 2 years.

She wasn't into gaming, but I tried introducing her to a few games a couple of times. She would start out being interested, but couldn't maintain interest.

She did love games like Plants versus Zombies and Farmville - and would play them in a way I might call obsessive, but who am I to judge that, eh?

Anyway, in terms of everyday life - it definitely affected her in a big way, and I would often suggest to her if it might be ADHD - but she wouldn't accept that and dismissed the notion.

She had a very hard time just sitting down and relaxing, and her biggest problem was finishing non-physical tasks that she knew had to be finished - like with her school projects. To me, it seemed that the fact that something HAD to be finished put an enormous amount of pressure on her, and she did everything she could to distract herself from doing it, because the thought of it having to be done - and her having to sit down and do the work just made her crazy. Big problem was that this distraction resulted in even more pressure, because time was always running out for her.

This made her very hard to be around when she had an important project, because she was so stressed - and nothing I said or didn't say seemed to help her or make her happy. I tried not saying anything at all - and that made it worse, because then I wasn't supporting her enough when she just needed to vent about it.

Anyway, she just couldn't make herself sit down and finish the damned homework, so she distracted herself. She would clean the house constantly - or she would go shopping. Sometimes, she would shop 4-5 times per day, which was something I'd never seen before. Personally, I loathe shopping and will keep that down to a minimum.

Needless to say, we had a lot of conflicts in the house - as I'm the exact opposite of someone with ADHD. I prefer to relax - and most tasks are chores to be done with me. So, because I hate having chores - I just do them immediately with very high efficiency - and I would NEVER do them as a distraction. This I do so I can focus on whatever it is I WANT to do. I'm not necessarily a messy person - though I'm sure many would think so - but I was absolutely NOT as "clean" as she would have wanted me to be, and she would often complain I didn't help out with the cleaning enough. I tried my best to contribute - but I also made it clear that it would only work if we made specific agreements about it, as cleaning "just because" would never, ever, be something I wanted to do.

The ONE thing we could do together with great success was to watch movies - and have dinner afterwards. I couldn't quite figure that out - because that meant sitting down and relaxing - but eventually I "got it". It was her way of letting go of her thoughts and just passively engage them in something pleasant. She's the only girl I've been with who loved movies more than I did - and we, literally, saw at least one new movie or the occasional episode of a TV show every day. We went to the movies very often - and sometimes several times per week, which was also kinda nice, because I hardly ever went to the movies otherwise.

I would have thought playing games could work in a similar way for her, but apparently she couldn't enjoy them because of the strain or pressure she felt when being challenged. This was something she told me often, but I didn't understand until she was diagnosed. So, to her, the worst part was definitely the pressure of having to focus her thoughts and accomplishing a challenging task. It scared her a lot.

This makes the condition resemble OCD in a way, though I realise it's a separate condition. But OCD is an anxiety disorder - and I've been suffering from anxiety for many years in the past, and I've learned to control it with quite a bit of success. But the fear is the thing - and it seems to lie at the heart of almost every kind of mental suffering there is.
Great post, thanks for sharing!

When I was in high school I had similar issues as your ex, and even now I have major issues with finishing tasks. I can't seem to finish many things that I start. I have a million ideas scribbled on paper basically, but none of them have been developed like they should have…
__________________________________________________ ______
My experiences dealing with my own ADHD

I was diagnosed with ADHD as a child, but never really properly treated because I would get side effects and not want to take the medicine anymore. I tried a million medicines and treatments that never seemed to help.

Anyway, this condition affects my adult life in a big way. Here's how it seems to work.

The "Gift" part. I get intense focus in a subject, be it a hobby, or some niche topic like physics or something, and for the next few weeks/months, every ounce of my being is poured into this topic. I become enthralled in it quite a bit, more than most people would. It's borderline obsessive, but it's more like a very heavy enjoyment period rather than being absolutely obsessed.

The gift part is that I can do some great things in my hobby during this period of intense focus. I can reach new heights of learning and it seems the sky is the limit. Then the "curse" part comes.

The "Curse" part is when I lose ALL focus in that particular topic. It just becomes dead to me. I literally cannot even force myself to do it anymore.

Let's take gaming for example. Right now I'm in the gift stage, playing a bunch of classic games and enjoying myself immensely. However, I'm starting to feel the curse coming on. It's been a few days since I really played a game heavily. That's how I know it's going to happen. I'm going to give up gaming for awhile and not even touch it. Probably for at least several weeks/months, maybe even longer.

It's a vicious cycle really because it affects everything in my life. Relationships, hobbies, etc. I have that initial period of intense focus and then nothing. I just give it all up completely and move on to the next shiny thing to distract me.

I'm pretty sure I need to see a psychologist as well as start taking medicine again if I want any hope of progressing any of my hobbies into careers. Not even careers, but just progressing them so I can fully enjoy them whenever I want, rather than having these hot/cold cycles.

I was just wondering if anyone had any advice for symptoms like this. I'd love to extend the time period of intense focus so I can enjoy things for a much longer time. If I could just channel this focus for many months/years on end like some people do, I'd probably be a millionaire by now, or at least have a decent career doing something I love. But as it stands now I just can't seem to get there…

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August 2nd, 2014, 16:33
I don't have ADHD, but to a degree every human has this problem:

If you do something very intensive over a longer period of time you get a burn out.

The "trick" is to restrict yourself. Try to live after a timetable. Take a break sometimes.
7 hours of working
4 hours of social life
1 hour RPGWatch
2 hours gaming


Even the best things get boring if you try them too often in a short period of time. Try eating ice-cream everyday for two month -> and the pleasure of ice-cream dwindles away.
For me it works best to focus on more than one hobby. I'm interested in science, history, mathematics, CRPGs, music, books, old local languages, barbacues
Every hobby gets a time slot.
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August 2nd, 2014, 16:44
About this condition I've just heard and read. By your description it looks like your interest in something grows and drops on hyperspeed. I mean, getting interest then losing the focus happens to everyone, just not that fast.

Not sure you should change that or go to any treatment. Meds? What meds? There are meds for that?
It's not a gift and it's not a curse either, just makes you different.

If you were on a job that deals only with shortterm projects, you'd be an awsome employee as you'd orbit passionately over it. Gaming is not such "job".
But think reasonably. Would you seriously want to be focused on videogames for the rest of your life? Just enjoy it while it lasts. There are so many other things a life offers - and life is short. Why would you spend ages on something instead of grabbing as much experience as you can in different things?
Career and millions is overrated. All you ever need is to be happy, you don't need money for that.

My honest opinion? If someone should be medicated, that'd be gambling and facebook addicts. In a way they grow ADHD so they quickly lose interest in being milked. Not you.
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August 2nd, 2014, 17:42
Originally Posted by HiddenX View Post
I don't have ADHD, but to a degree every human has this problem:

If you do something very intensive over a longer period of time you get a burn out.

The "trick" is to restrict yourself. Try to live after a timetable. Take a break sometimes.
7 hours of working
4 hours of social life
1 hour RPGWatch
2 hours gaming


Even the best things get boring if you try them too often in a short period of time. Try eating ice-cream everyday for two month -> and the pleasure of ice-cream dwindles away.
For me it works best to focus on more than one hobby. I'm interested in science, history, mathematics, CRPGs, music, books, old local languages, barbacues
Every hobby gets a time slot.
Thanks for the advice, but here's the thing with me. I can only do one hobby at a time. I simply can't do multiple things at once. I have to be fully engrossed in one hobby that I do for a little while, then I give it up completely for something else. This cycle goes on and on and nothing ever really gets done.

It's affected my job life too. I'm unemployed now but when I was last employed, I could have been the president of the company. I was rising through the ranks in a very short time, had great outlooks on things and things were going wonderfully. Then the curse hit again, and I got so disinterested in what I was doing that I was forced to quit. In fact, it got so bad that I quit over the phone without any warning, so now I've burned that bridge.

It may seem like ordinary burnout, but it's amplified x10 in me.

Originally Posted by joxer View Post
About this condition I've just heard and read. By your description it looks like your interest in something grows and drops on hyperspeed. I mean, getting interest then losing the focus happens to everyone, just not that fast.

Not sure you should change that or go to any treatment. Meds? What meds? There are meds for that?
It's not a gift and it's not a curse either, just makes you different.

If you were on a job that deals only with shortterm projects, you'd be an awsome employee as you'd orbit passionately over it. Gaming is not such "job".
But think reasonably. Would you seriously want to be focused on videogames for the rest of your life? Just enjoy it while it lasts. There are so many other things a life offers - and life is short. Why would you spend ages on something instead of grabbing as much experience as you can in different things?
Career and millions is overrated. All you ever need is to be happy, you don't need money for that.

My honest opinion? If someone should be medicated, that'd be gambling and facebook addicts. In a way they grow ADHD so they quickly lose interest in being milked. Not you.
I want to spend ages on something because I want to succeed in that one thing.

Gaming, for example. I have a passion for game design. I could probably become a game developer if I tried, and I feel like playing games now is preparing me for something like that in the future. However, I'll never see it because I'll burnout far too quickly and won't want anything to do with gaming after awhile.

Also, it affects every other hobby/aspect of my life. I make music as well, and probably could have been a great musician if I stuck with it, but it gets to the point that it's impossible to stick with anymore and bam, it's over for awhile (sometimes a year or more, until finally the spark comes back and it's back to square one again).

Ideally, I'd like to have a bunch of hobbies going at once that I can focus on those things all the time. Books, movies, music, friends. But as it stands I can't really do that because I have these intense focus periods followed by intense burnout shortly after.

Thanks for listening though guy, I appreciate it. It feels good just to vent sometimes. Maybe I need more structure in my life. I should try setting a timetable and sticking to it for awhile. Thanks for the tip

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August 2nd, 2014, 17:59
I don't think any of us here can focus on gaming all the time - and I know I certainly can't. Also, it's not as intense or deep as your focus seems to be, so I'm not sure it's that much better.

Obviously, if it's affecting your ability to function during normal life - then that's different.

You should most definitely see someone professional - and all we can do is provide amateur advice.

But you do seem to say "I can't" a lot, which - while it might be true right now - is never a good way to change anything. If you're physically capable of doing something, you can do it. You might not enjoy it - and it might never be particularly interesting, but you CAN do it.

The thing is that you're afraid of this - and the fear is what's causing it to be a big problem - not the attention deficit itself. Well, that's what it sounds like - and my advice would be to "accept" being afraid and accept not having fun or being interested, and simply do the things anyway.

I know more than a little about the human mind, and one thing I've learned is that while we can't control our thoughts - we CAN control how we respond to our thoughts to a surprising degree. The nature of thoughts tend to reflect our emotional state - so if you can manage to accept being afraid, the fear will eventually dwindle into nothing much - and your thoughts will be much more positive.

If you perservere - and you have to keep at it for a long time - you might just end up surprising yourself and you might even start enjoying things you'd normally be incapable of because of burnout.

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August 2nd, 2014, 18:31
I would go with hiddenx' advice.

It's easy to try with nothing to lose and much to gain.


Write a timetable on excel and put alarms on your phone to stick to the timetable.

Ensure it's colour coded so it's easy to visualise and print it out.

Stick it to your wall and try and do that for a week.

See how you feel after that week.
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August 2nd, 2014, 20:15
I will not go explaining widely my thoughts on life again since those things are hard to understand and it'd again be marked as offtopic, cut out and titled as juvenile whatever. As you may see above, ADHD IMO is a positive thing. So a short opinion from this board's looney.

You have a talent, not a flaw. Killing it would be a sin towards evolution.
Instead of becoming a boring average person, accept what you are and enjoy it.
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August 2nd, 2014, 21:01
joxer sometimes I think you are not from this world and where a the men in black to catch the alien…
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August 3rd, 2014, 06:07
The Watch has many different personalities but I have always had this feeling that we share a common similarity not entirely evidenced by our passion for video game.

I too have a stack of entertainment that I can't finish. Including games. Sometimes I feel I am not finishing because I don't want this part of my life to be over. I probably could have been diagnosed with something similar when I was younger. I found a coping mechanism and learned how to finish things that matter. Once a coach told me that a young person starts the confidence trail when they succeed with something no matter how small and each success will build upon another. Tuning out all the naysayers around oneself and the biggest naysayer(in our head) is the key.
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August 3rd, 2014, 06:55
I spend too much time on stupid stuff, and learn all about stupid things. It has its advantages and disadvantages I guess, but overall it probably saves time because since I get tired of BS easily I don't let people push me around. I am surprised how much people put up with and let others waste their time and energy on nonsense.
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August 4th, 2014, 02:47
Originally Posted by redman5427 View Post
Once a coach told me that a young person starts the confidence trail when they succeed with something no matter how small and each success will build upon another. Tuning out all the naysayers around oneself and the biggest naysayer(in our head) is the key.
That's true. The only problem with that is, I finish something, congratulate myself for doing so, but the week later I sleepwalk back again into old habits. It's a constant work in progress, I guess.

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August 4th, 2014, 10:07
Well, I think that with all the different combinations of letters that exist today to describe peope it is much more common to have one compared to not having it.

So if you have a letter combination you should probably consider yourself normal!

I happend to know some experts in letter combinations and I have learned a lot about that, and it is scary how sometimes you can just meet a person and say like I guess that person probably has XXXX letter combination from the way they act.. and it can quite often turn out to be right.. and sometimes they are not even aware of it.

I think it is kind of wrong sometimes to call all of the letter combinations disorder though, a lot of it is just a part of people being different, and you can often learn to use it to your advantage and live a good life anyway. I've found from experiance of the people working with those things that most things is not impossible even if you have a letter combination you just have to practice a lot harder to do certain things.
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August 4th, 2014, 17:58
On the surface, highly sensitive pepople (HSPs) often seem to have ADHS, too. Because they are so easily drawn away by other sources of stimuli.

In "my" HSP community, there were several people having been "accused" of having ADHS, but instead simply being highly sensitive people (HSPs).

More about HSPs here : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Highly_sensitive_person
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August 4th, 2014, 19:18
Fluent: I work as a clinical psychologist and sometimes perform the investigations for ADHD. I do not however work with treatment of ADHD so I doubt I've any useful practical insight. My recommendation would instead be to see a psychologist and a doctor who specialises in the field. Many treatments fail to deliver any result and it seems pretty common for our patients to try a lot before they find a combination that give enough effect. Try different things until you find something that works.
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August 4th, 2014, 20:18
That's true for most of not all treatments for psychological issues, sadly.
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August 4th, 2014, 23:10
Originally Posted by Alrik Fassbauer View Post
On the surface, highly sensitive pepople (HSPs) often seem to have ADHS, too. Because they are so easily drawn away by other sources of stimuli.

In "my" HSP community, there were several people having been "accused" of having ADHS, but instead simply being highly sensitive people (HSPs).

More about HSPs here : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Highly_sensitive_person
Thanks alot Alrik.
Now, because of this new knowledge, I now have more letters to add to my existencial business card.

Did an Oprah questionnaire…

You're a Highly-Sensitive Person (HSP)

With your hyperawareness come many strengths. HSPs consider matters deeply and often have unique and interesting perspectives.
You are intuitive and tend to be an emotional leader (the first to be outraged by injustice, for example). But because you're so tuned in to the subtleties of your surroundings, you can feel overwhelmed in chaotic environments.
You're not necessarily shy or introverted; you simply think more clearly when you're not overstimulated—which is why navigating unfamiliar places and meeting many new people at once (think cocktail parties or client presentations) can be especially taxing.
To avoid shutting down in such situations, it can help to prepare in advance. Rehearse what you want to say. Brainstorm conversation starters. Bring a friend for social support. Take frequent breaks.
It's crucial for HSPs to build downtime into their lives. Make rest a priority at least one day a week. Take time off every three months. Learn to meditate. And try not to overextend yourself when it comes to family and friends.
Thanks to their affinity for reading other people's emotions, HSPs frequently dole out more support than they can afford to give.
To handle your physical sensitivities, choose decaf tea, coffee, and sodas. And carry a snack with you (preferably some form of protein) so you never get too hungry.
Finally, keep in mind that HSPs tend to change careers several times. More than most people, you crave meaningful work—but a job that's too stressful won't make you happy. It may take several tries to find the right fit.
Yeah. Thanks again…
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August 6th, 2014, 19:40
The quoted text describes imho *pefectly* what matters to highly sensitive people !
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