Duolingo - RPGWatch Forums
|
Your donations keep RPGWatch running!
RPGWatch Forums » General Forums » Off-Topic » Duolingo

Default Duolingo

January 14th, 2020, 00:37
I’m really curious: anybody else here learning a new language via Duolingo?
https://www.duolingo.com/

It is fun, I’m doing 10 minutes of Danish everyday (but you can decide to do 5 or even 20 minutes a day). You get rewards that stimulate to do it every day. You can do it everywhere, on your phone or tablet.

It is possible to learn many many other languages (even Dutch), including Latin, Navajo, Welsh, Gaelic, Esperanto, Klingon, and High Valyrian.
I have tried Arabic and Russian, but I had difficulties with the letters. So I turned to a more familiar language - am doing this now for twee weeks (for free).

Yup, I’m enthusiastic!
--
1. It's not what you say - it is the way you say it.
Lovely 2 minute video: 'Change your words, change your world'

2. Getting a YouTube video loaded and other BB codes, see this post
Eye is offline

Eye

Eye's Avatar
Eye Watch
Super Moderator

#1

Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Europe
Posts: 2,228
Mentioned: 48 Post(s)

Default 

January 14th, 2020, 02:22
I've heard about it but never tried.
But I'm interested in chinese as it's now the #1 steam language, the problem is I don't know what their writing means.
--
Toka Koka
joxer is offline

joxer

joxer's Avatar
The Smoker
Original Sin 1 & 2 Donor

#2

Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 21,800
Mentioned: 160 Post(s)
+1:

Default 

January 14th, 2020, 08:59
Thanks, will give it a shot. Tried french with assimil but stopped after a couple of months.
kazga is offline

kazga

Watcher

#3

Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 61
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
+1:

Default 

January 14th, 2020, 09:15
Originally Posted by joxer View Post
I've heard about it but never tried.
But I'm interested in chinese as it's now the #1 steam language, the problem is I don't know what their writing means.
Yes, that is really a downside of Duolingo, there is no introduction of the writing.
I would have liked to learn Chinese too.
--
1. It's not what you say - it is the way you say it.
Lovely 2 minute video: 'Change your words, change your world'

2. Getting a YouTube video loaded and other BB codes, see this post
Eye is offline

Eye

Eye's Avatar
Eye Watch
Super Moderator

#4

Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Europe
Posts: 2,228
Mentioned: 48 Post(s)

Default 

January 14th, 2020, 09:17
Originally Posted by kazga View Post
Thanks, will give it a shot. Tried french with assimil but stopped after a couple of months.
Keep me updated, I’m interested in your opinion about it.
--
1. It's not what you say - it is the way you say it.
Lovely 2 minute video: 'Change your words, change your world'

2. Getting a YouTube video loaded and other BB codes, see this post
Eye is offline

Eye

Eye's Avatar
Eye Watch
Super Moderator

#5

Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Europe
Posts: 2,228
Mentioned: 48 Post(s)

Default 

January 14th, 2020, 13:22
I'm not sure an idiot like me can actually learn anything these days….
you is offline

you

Lazy_dog
RPGWatch Donor
Original Sin 2 Donor

#6

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: usa - no longer boston
Posts: 7,739
Mentioned: 59 Post(s)

Default 

January 14th, 2020, 13:35
Mental stimulation, like learning a second language or starting to learn how to play an instrument - anything new - keeps your brain young. See for studies or articles Google/Duckduckgo. It can delay the onset of dementia, because new connections between nerve cells are made and new brain cells may be generated thus building up a functional reserve that provides a hedge against future cell loss.

So if you are already an idiot now, start with Duolingo right this minute, @you, before it is too late and you can not comprehend anything anymore! Not even how to feed your fish!

Edit
for a long time it was believed that the only time to learn a second language was as a child, when your brain is still nice and sponge-y. This research says even learning it later has positive effects on mental function.

But what is it about language that is so good for our brains? Bak says the act of switching between several languages may give the brain a workout, since you have many more words and meanings to choose from before speaking. He compares it to the physical workout of swimming. “You are using most of your muscles and breathing and so on,” he says. “In being bilingual you’re activating a whole range of different mental functions.”
Source:
https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/…ur-brain-young
--
1. It's not what you say - it is the way you say it.
Lovely 2 minute video: 'Change your words, change your world'

2. Getting a YouTube video loaded and other BB codes, see this post
Eye is offline

Eye

Eye's Avatar
Eye Watch
Super Moderator

#7

Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Europe
Posts: 2,228
Mentioned: 48 Post(s)
+1:

Default 

January 14th, 2020, 17:06
I've been using Duolingo for 125 days now. The first 100+ days doing Spanish and recently adding Norwegian to it. Now I am alternating between them on a daily basis.
I've selected Spanish as I always felt it would be nice to understand Spanish. It is spoken in a lot of places
The selection of Norwegian just kind of happened. I was thinking of doing a Scandinavian language and was in the process of selecting either Danish, Swedish or Norwegian. I then went for Swedish, to find out after two days I accidentally selected Norwegian
At that point I figured it is just as good a Scandinavian language to learn than Swedish, so I am sticking with it.


The downside of Duolingo is that there is almost no theory. It is all about learning by doing. In the beginning that is fine. But after a while things get more complicated and for me it would be nice to have more background theory about the rules of the language.
--
In the beginning the Universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move. Douglas Adams
There are no facts, only interpretations. Nietzsche
Some cause happiness wherever they go; others whenever they go. Oscar Wilde
Myrthos is offline

Myrthos

Myrthos's Avatar
Cave Canem
Administrator
RPGWatch Team

#8

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Netherlands
Posts: 9,498
Mentioned: 111 Post(s)

Default 

January 17th, 2020, 08:32
@Myrthos: lykke til!

Btw: IMO selecting Norwegian is a good choice, because we're sort of betwern Danish and Swedish. In general we understand (and are understood by) Danes and Swedes better (methinks) than they undestand each other.

A pibbur who currently is learning Python.

Ps. There is a book available on amazon, Norwegian Verbs And Essentials of Grammar, which has got good user reviews. Ds.

Ps2. And of course, just ask if there's anything I can help you with. I know the language fairly well. Ds.
--
Over the mountain watching the watcher
Last edited by a pibbur; January 17th, 2020 at 08:51.
a pibbur is offline

a pibbur

a pibbur's Avatar
Feeling … lonely?

#9

Join Date: Nov 2019
Posts: 95
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
+1:

Default 

January 17th, 2020, 10:50
Is there any logic in using ‘et’ and ‘en’? Et æg, en dreng.
And pluriel. Why ‘drengene’ but ‘pigerne’? Why the ‘r’ in some and no ‘r’ in others? Especially the pluriel I find difficult.
--
1. It's not what you say - it is the way you say it.
Lovely 2 minute video: 'Change your words, change your world'

2. Getting a YouTube video loaded and other BB codes, see this post
Eye is offline

Eye

Eye's Avatar
Eye Watch
Super Moderator

#10

Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Europe
Posts: 2,228
Mentioned: 48 Post(s)

Default 

January 17th, 2020, 15:04
Well, I don't know the finer details of Danish grammar, but I know something (because of the similarity to Norwegian).

1. "et", "en".
This has to do with grammatical gender. Danish has 2 genders. "æg" is of neuter gender, and those words use the particle "et" in undetermined form. "Dreng" is of the common gender, and those use the particle "en". Determined form is given by suffixes, "-et" for neuter and "-en" for common. Thus we have "drengen" (the boy) and "ægget" (the egg). Observe the extra 'g'.

So, how do we know whether a noun has neuter or common gender? You might think that neuter form is used for things, and people, animals use the common form, but that's not very reliable. "bog" (book) is of common gender. "fruentimmer" (one probably not often used word for woman) is neuter. You have to really make an effort to learn the gender for each noun.

BTW: "æg" can also mean the edge of a knife, and that word is of common gender (en æg, æggen).

2. Pluriel. I don't know the rule for the "-rne" form. I've checked a few examples, and it seems like nouns ending with an "-e" use that form, but I really don't know that.

a pibbur who is common in Danish

PS. A comparison with Norwegian: Most of us have (!) three genders. Neuter is similar to Danish neuter. Masculinum is similar to danish common. And then we have femininum which is given by "ei" and "-a": "Ei kvinne", "kvinna". One exception to the 3 gender rule: the dialect we (I) use in my home town Bergen, we have only two genders. DS.

PS2. We do have the plural "-rne" form in Norwegian as well, but not like they use it in Danish. We say "pikene", not "pikerne". We use the "-rne" form for nouns ending with "-er", such as "løper" ("runner") - "løpere"/"løperne" (undetermined/determined form). DS.
--
Over the mountain watching the watcher
Last edited by a pibbur; January 17th, 2020 at 15:45.
a pibbur is offline

a pibbur

a pibbur's Avatar
Feeling … lonely?

#11

Join Date: Nov 2019
Posts: 95
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
+1:

Default 

January 17th, 2020, 16:05
Thanks, pibbur. Much appreciated.

As for 1. I feared I just had to learn the right gender by heart, and you confirmed it.
As for 2. Thanks! I’ll pay more attention to the -e to see if that is the case.

I don’t envy @Myrthos having to learn 3 genders… I doubt duolingo offers the Bergen variant.

Anyway, so far Danish, to me, seems to be easier than Dutch, take the verb conjugations: jeg spiser, du spiser, han spiser, det spiser, vi spiser, i spiser, de spiser. I love it!
Often, when listening (not reading) Danish seems like a mixture of English, German and Dutch.
--
1. It's not what you say - it is the way you say it.
Lovely 2 minute video: 'Change your words, change your world'

2. Getting a YouTube video loaded and other BB codes, see this post
Eye is offline

Eye

Eye's Avatar
Eye Watch
Super Moderator

#12

Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Europe
Posts: 2,228
Mentioned: 48 Post(s)

Default 

January 17th, 2020, 17:03
Originally Posted by a pibbur View Post
A pibbur who currently is learning Python.
That language doesn't exist in Duolingo


Originally Posted by a pibbur View Post
Ps. There is a book available on amazon, Norwegian Verbs And Essentials of Grammar, which has got good user reviews. Ds.
Thanks I look into that


Originally Posted by a pibbur View Post
Ps2. And of course, just ask if there's anything I can help you with. I know the language fairly well. Ds.
Thanks for the offer!
--
In the beginning the Universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move. Douglas Adams
There are no facts, only interpretations. Nietzsche
Some cause happiness wherever they go; others whenever they go. Oscar Wilde
Myrthos is offline

Myrthos

Myrthos's Avatar
Cave Canem
Administrator
RPGWatch Team

#13

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Netherlands
Posts: 9,498
Mentioned: 111 Post(s)

Default 

January 17th, 2020, 17:10
Ewe guise are two smart four me. Aye bearly no American.
--
c-computer, r-role, p-playing, g-game, nut-extreme fan
=crpgnut or just
'nut @crpgnut
crpgnut is offline

crpgnut

crpgnut's Avatar
Skyrim Worshipper
RPGWatch Donor
Original Sin Donor

#14

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: St. Louis, Mo USA
Posts: 7,835
Mentioned: 39 Post(s)
+1:

Default 

January 19th, 2020, 00:05
Originally Posted by Eye View Post
Thanks, pibbur. Much appreciated.

As for 1. I feared I just had to learn the right gender by heart, and you confirmed it.
As for 2. Thanks! IÂ’ll pay more attention to the -e to see if that is the case.

I donÂ’t envy @Myrthos having to learn 3 gendersÂ… I doubt duolingo offers the Bergen variant.

Anyway, so far Danish, to me, seems to be easier than Dutch, take the verb conjugations: jeg spiser, du spiser, han spiser, det spiser, vi spiser, i spiser, de spiser. I love it!
Often, when listening (not reading) Danish seems like a mixture of English, German and Dutch.
Again I respond from the perspective of a Norwegian (but I suspect Danish isn't that different). In some ways the scandinavian languages are easier when it comes to verbs, in the sense that we don't conjugaet them depending on gender or singular/plural. OTOH in Norwegian we have a lot of irregular verbs. Look at the folowing regarding tense (non-finite, present, past), For instance "hoppe" (jump) is a regular verb: "hoppe" (to jump), "hopper" (I jump), "hoppet" (jumped), "har hoppet" (I have jumped), But we also have:

"gå" (go, walk), "går", "gikk" "har gått". And
"få" (receive), "får", "fikk", "har fått".

But:
"slå" (strike), "slår", "slo", "har slått"
"flå" (to skin), "flår", "flådde", "har flådd".

AFAIK these verbs are perceived as difficult by foreigners. And yes, you have to memorize each of them.

Regarding gender: From wikipedia, I understand that dutch have two genders (common and neuter) as well. Perhaps you can infer something from that, but not always. In German (my Dutch skill leaves something to be desired), "book" (Buch) is neuter, but "bog" is common (or masculine ("bok") in Norwegian).

As I said, in Norwegian we have three genders. However, using the same articles for femininum and masculinum is allowed, although not encouraged. Thus we have "sol" (sun) which should be "ei sol" (a sun) and "sola" (the sun). However you are allowed to write it like a masculine noun: "en sol", "solen". Should make it more easier, and in Bergen, no one will blame you from doing that.

a pibbur who consider himself masculine ("en pibbur", "pibburen").
--
Over the mountain watching the watcher
Last edited by a pibbur; January 21st, 2020 at 00:31.
a pibbur is offline

a pibbur

a pibbur's Avatar
Feeling … lonely?

#15

Join Date: Nov 2019
Posts: 95
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
+1:

Default 

January 19th, 2020, 00:12
I'm late on this thread, but I recommend Duolinguo to some parents of my kids to give them extra practice learning English. I think its pretty good for beginners in a language.
forgottenlor is offline

forgottenlor

forgottenlor's Avatar
Font of Useless Knowledge
RPGWatch Team
RPGWatch Donor

#16

Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Vienna, Austria
Posts: 2,221
Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
+1:

Default 

January 19th, 2020, 00:19
Originally Posted by a pibbur View Post
@Myrthos: lykke til!

Btw: IMO selecting Norwegian is a good choice, because we're sort of betwern Danish and Swedish. In general we understand (and are understood by) Danes and Swedes better (methinks) than they undestand each other.
Do you seriously understand Danish? I've no problem reading it since the written language is very close to Swedish (or Norwegian for that matter), but listening to them speak…no. They mute the second half of the words…

Norwegian is a lot easier to understand, but I find it varies a lot between dialects. Oslo works just fine, Bergen…not so much. But still a lot easier than Danish to me.
TomRon is offline

TomRon

TomRon's Avatar
SasqWatch
RPGWatch Donor
Original Sin Donor

#17

Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Sweden
Posts: 3,018
Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
+1:

Default 

January 19th, 2020, 00:33
Originally Posted by TomRon View Post
Do you seriously understand Danish? I've no problem reading it since the written language is very close to Swedish (or Norwegian for that matter), but listening to them speak…no. They mute the second half of the words…

Norwegian is a lot easier to understand, but I find it varies a lot between dialects. Oslo works just fine, Bergen…not so much. But still a lot easier than Danish to me.
Understanding spoken Danish is a challenge. But yes, I do understand it (maybe because they modify/simplify their talking when they learn that I'm a foreigner).

And yes, Norwegian dialects may also be a challenge, and in Norway dialects have a high status - people are encouraged to use their dialect almost everywhere. BTW the Bergen dialect is far from the worst.

The Oslo dialect (standard east-Norwegian) is as close to official Norwegian (which doesn't exist) as it gets.

One more thing: We have three official Norwegian written languages: Sami, New Norwegian, and "book Norwegian". The latter is derived from Danish (due to our 400 year union with Denmark) and is the form used by most (90%) Norwegians. New Norwegian is mostly derived from western dialects in Norway. Both versions are mutually comprehensible. But since "book Norwegian" is the most common version, that is IMO the version of choice for foreigners learning the language.

a pibbur who in New Norwegian would be "ein pibbur".

PS. Some claim (Norwegian comedians) that spoken Danish is incomprehensible to everyone, including the Danes. DS.
--
Over the mountain watching the watcher
a pibbur is offline

a pibbur

a pibbur's Avatar
Feeling … lonely?

#18

Join Date: Nov 2019
Posts: 95
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
+1:

Default 

January 19th, 2020, 01:37
Ehhh right. I THOUGHT Danish was easy, but after reading the comments of you two, @a pibbur and @TomRon
Yes, I have noticed that there is hardly any difference when hearing ‘æble’ and ‘aeblet’, and ‘vand’. and ‘vandet’. They swallow the ‘t’.
Also, the ‘d’ sound like an ‘l’ but pronounced as if you’re drunk, right? I have learned ‘edderkop’, and ‘skildpadde’, which sound like ‘ellerkop’, and ‘’skildpalle’.

About the verbs… I am at the earliest beginners level. So the present only.
And ‘bog’ is neuter in Dutch, just like in German.
The indefinite article in Dutch though is always ‘een’, no matter whether the word is masculine/feminine or a neuter. Definite article is ‘de’ or ‘het’ (= neuter).
So: en bog = een boek. Bogen = het boek.
The latter, ‘bogen’, is a bit confusing, because ‘bogen’ looks like our plural ‘boeken’.
When reading a word like ‘kvinden’ I tend to think of ‘women’ (‘vrouwen’) and not ‘the woman’, ‘manden’ I think of ‘men’ (‘mannen’), not of ‘the man’. But I hope that is just a matter of practice, the more I’ll practise the easier it will become.
--
1. It's not what you say - it is the way you say it.
Lovely 2 minute video: 'Change your words, change your world'

2. Getting a YouTube video loaded and other BB codes, see this post
Last edited by Eye; January 19th, 2020 at 02:11.
Eye is offline

Eye

Eye's Avatar
Eye Watch
Super Moderator

#19

Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Europe
Posts: 2,228
Mentioned: 48 Post(s)

Default 

January 20th, 2020, 20:57
Originally Posted by Eye View Post
It is fun, I’m doing 10 minutes of Danish everyday
Good luck with that! Everyone knows that not even the Danish understands each other in that absolutely horrible language

loading…
--
Latest creations: Fallout NV: A Wasteland in Bloom / Fallout NV: WFO v3.2
vurt is offline

vurt

vurt's Avatar
serial 𝓶𝓸𝓭𝓭𝓮𝓻𝓮𝓻

#20

Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: The land of rape and honey
Posts: 3,257
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
+1:
RPGWatch Forums » General Forums » Off-Topic » Duolingo
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

All times are GMT +2. The time now is 07:45.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by DragonByte Security (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright by RPGWatch